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David’s Psalm of Thanksgiving

7 Then on that day David first appointed the singing of praises to the Lord by Asaph and his kindred.



O give thanks to the Lord, call on his name,

make known his deeds among the peoples.


Sing to him, sing praises to him,

tell of all his wonderful works.


Glory in his holy name;

let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice.


Seek the Lord and his strength,

seek his presence continually.


Remember the wonderful works he has done,

his miracles, and the judgments he uttered,


O offspring of his servant Israel,

children of Jacob, his chosen ones.



He is the Lord our God;

his judgments are in all the earth.


Remember his covenant forever,

the word that he commanded, for a thousand generations,


the covenant that he made with Abraham,

his sworn promise to Isaac,


which he confirmed to Jacob as a statute,

to Israel as an everlasting covenant,


saying, “To you I will give the land of Canaan

as your portion for an inheritance.”



When they were few in number,

of little account, and strangers in the land,


wandering from nation to nation,

from one kingdom to another people,


he allowed no one to oppress them;

he rebuked kings on their account,


saying, “Do not touch my anointed ones;

do my prophets no harm.”



Sing to the Lord, all the earth.

Tell of his salvation from day to day.


Declare his glory among the nations,

his marvelous works among all the peoples.


For great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised;

he is to be revered above all gods.


For all the gods of the peoples are idols,

but the Lord made the heavens.


Honor and majesty are before him;

strength and joy are in his place.



Ascribe to the Lord, O families of the peoples,

ascribe to the Lord glory and strength.


Ascribe to the Lord the glory due his name;

bring an offering, and come before him.

Worship the Lord in holy splendor;


tremble before him, all the earth.

The world is firmly established; it shall never be moved.


Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice,

and let them say among the nations, “The Lord is king!”


Let the sea roar, and all that fills it;

let the field exult, and everything in it.


Then shall the trees of the forest sing for joy

before the Lord, for he comes to judge the earth.


O give thanks to the Lord, for he is good;

for his steadfast love endures forever.


35 Say also:

“Save us, O God of our salvation,

and gather and rescue us from among the nations,

that we may give thanks to your holy name,

and glory in your praise.


Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel,

from everlasting to everlasting.”

Then all the people said “Amen!” and praised the Lord.

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1Ch 16:7-43. His Psalm of Thanksgiving.

7. Then on that day David delivered first this psalm—Among the other preparations for this solemn inauguration, the royal bard had composed a special hymn for the occasion. Doubtless it had been previously in the hands of Asaph and his assistants, but it was now publicly committed to them as they entered for the first time on the performance of their sacred duties. It occupies the greater part of this chapter (1Ch 16:8-36), and seems to have been compiled from other psalms of David, previously known to the Israelites, as the whole of it will be found, with very slight variations, in Ps 96:1-13; 105:1-15; 106:47, 48. In the form, however, in which it is given by the sacred historian, it seems to have been the first psalm given for use in the tabernacle service. Abounding, as it does, with the liveliest ascriptions of praise to God for the revelation of His glorious character and the display of His marvellous works and containing, as it does, so many pointed allusions to the origin, privileges, and peculiar destiny of the chosen people, it was admirably calculated to animate the devotions and call forth the gratitude of the assembled multitude.

36. all the people said, Amen—(Compare Ps 72:19, 20; 106:48). In the former, the author of the doxology utters the "amen" himself, while in the latter the people are exhorted to say "amen." This may arise from the fact that the latter psalm originally concluded with the injunction to say "amen." But in this historical account of the festival, it was necessary to relate that the people obeyed this injunction on the occasion referred to, and therefore the words "let them praise," were altered into "and they praised" [Bertheau].