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NEGRO EDUCATION AND EVANGELIZATION. I. Education. Early Status ( 1). In the Northern States ( 2). In the South ( 3). Benevolent Societies ( 4). Educational Agencies ( 5). Results ( 6). II. Evangelization. 1. General History. Religious Condition of Early Slaves ( 1).

I. Education: Negro slaves imported to America

were kept designedly in ignorance. The written

and unwritten law of the land was that Negroes

should receive no instruction. In the North this

custom gradually was given up, but

x. Early with the cotton gin in the South it

Status. crystallized into law. The law of

Georgia (1829) is typical: " If any

slave, Negro or free person of color, or any white

person shall teach any other slave, Negro or free

person of color to read or write, either written or

printed characters, the same free person of color

or slave shall be punished by fine and whipping, or

fine or whipping, at the discretion of the court; and

if a white person so offend, he, she, or they shall be

Lack of Early MissionaryEort ort ($ 2). Effs for Negro Evangelization ( 3). Results < 4). 2. Statistics. 3. Denominational Evangelization. a. Methodists. b. Baptists.

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Drew York Sabbath Committee THE NEW SCHAFF-HERZOG Newman, Albert Henry 150

The secretary and members of the committee have addressed public meetings in behalf of the reform in many of the larger cities of the country. It acted effectively in behalf of the Sabbath during the Civil War, and it was at its instigation that President Lincoln issued his famous Sunday order to the army and navy in 1862. It aided in the closing on Sunday of the national industrial expositions, and secured official recognition of Sunday by the representatives of the United States government at international expositions in Europe.

The committee has accumulated a valuable reference library open to the use of any who may wish to write or speak upon the Sunday question, and conducts a wide correspondence, at home and abroad. It has also been the organ of cooperation with similar movements in Europe and has been represented by its secretary at the important international congresses on Sunday rest which have been held on the continent. During its entire history it has had the service of a general secretary as its executive officer, who has devoted his entire time to its work, writing and editing its numerous publications, holding public conferences, and acting with other friends of the cause in defeating hostile legislation. The first secretary was succeeded by Philip Schaff, who did a most important work in securing the sympathy and cooperation of large numbers of the German population. On his resignation in 1869 W. W. Atterbury was called to the position which he held for upward of thirty years. Upon his resignation because of advanced years, he was elected a member of the committee and its recording secretary. He was succeeded by William S. Hubbell. See SUNDAY.

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