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THE SECOND EPISTLE OF PAUL TO TIMOTHY - Chapter 1 - Verse 12

Verse 12. For the which cause I also suffer these things. That is, I suffer on account of my purpose to carry the gospel to the Gentiles. See Barnes "Col 1:24".

 

Nevertheless I am not ashamed. Comp. See Barnes "Ro 1:16".

 

For I know whom I have believed. Marg., trusted. The idea is, that he understood the character of that Redeemer to whom he had committed his eternal interests, and knew that he had no reason to be ashamed of confiding in him. He was able to keep all that he had intrusted to his care, and would not suffer him to be lost. See Barnes "Isa 28:16".

 

And am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him. That is, the soul with all its immortal interests. A man has nothing of higher value to intrust to another than the intereats of his soul, and there is no other act of confidence like that in which he intrusts the keeping of that soul to the Son of God. Learn hence,

(1.) that religion consists in committing the soul to the care of the Lord Jesus; because

(a) we feel that we cannot secure its salvation ourselves;

(b) it is by nature in danger;

(c) if not saved by him, it will not be saved at all.

(2.) That is a great and invaluable treasure which is committed to him.

(a) No higher treasure can be committed to another;

(b) in connection with that the whole question of our happiness on earth and in heaven is intrusted to him, and all depends on his fidelity.

(3.) It is done by the true Christian with file most entire confidence, so that the mind is at rest. The grounds of this confidence are

(a) what is said of the mighty power of the Saviour;

(b) his promises that he will keep all who confide in him, (comp. Joh 10:27-29;)

(c) experience—the fact that those who have trusted in him have found that he is able to keep them.

(4.) This act of committing the soul, with all its interests, to the Saviour, is the true source of peace in the trials of life. This is so because

(a) having done this, we feel that our great interests are secure. If the soul is safe, why need we be disturbed by the loss of health, or property, or other temporal comforts. Those are secondary things. A man who is shipwrecked, and who sees his son or daughter safe with him on the shore, will be little concerned that a casket of jewels fell overboard—however valuable it might be.

(b) All those trials will soon pass away, and he will be safe in heaven.

(c) These very things may further the great object—the salvation of the soul. A man's great interests may be more safe when in a prison than when in a palace; on a pallet of straw than on a bed of down; when constrained to say, "Give us this day our daily bread," than when encompassed with the wealth of Croesus.

Against that day. The day of judgment—called "that day," without anything further to designate it, because it is the great day; "the day for which all other days were made." It seems to have been so much the object of thought and conversation among the early Christians that the apostle supposed that he would be understood by merely referring to it as "that day;" that is, the day which they were always preaching about, and talking about, and thinking about.

{a} "nevertheless" Ro 1:18 {1} "whom I have believed" "trusted" {b} "have committed"

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