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BOSTON, THOMAS: Church of Scotland; b. at Dunse (13 m. w. of Berwick-upon-Tweed), Berwickshire, Mar. 17, 1677; d. at Ettrick (40 m. s. of Edinburgh), Selkirkshire, May 20, 1732. He studied at the University of Edinburgh; became minister at Simprin, Berwickshire, 1699; at Ettrick, 1707. By circulating the Marrow of Modern Divinity among his friends he started the Marrow Controversy. He wrote much and has exercised great influence in the Presbyterian Churches both of Scotland and England. The works by which he is now best known are Human Nature in its Fourfold State of Primitive Integrity, Entire Depravation, Begun Recovery, and Consummate Happiness or Misery (Edinburgh, 1720), commonly called "Boston's Fourfold State"; The Sovereignty and Wisdom of God Displayed in the Afflictions of Men (1737; reprinted as The Crook in the Lot, with memoir, Glasgow, 1863). He left an autobiography published as Memoirs (Edinburgh, 1776; ed. G. H. Morrison, 1899), and printed from Boston's manuscript, with introduction, notes, and bibliography by G. L. Low, under the title General Account of my Life (Edinburgh, 1907). His Whole Works edited by S. McMillan were published in twelve volumes at Aberdeen in 1848-52.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Besides the autobiography mentioned above, consult: A. ŗ Wood, Athenú Oxonienses, ed. P. Bliss, iii, 407-409, 4 vols., Oxford, London, 1813-20; Jean L. Watson, Life and Times of Thomas Boston, Edinburgh, 1883; A. Thomson, Thomas Boston, London, 1895; DNB, v, 424-426.

BOTTOME, MARGARET (McDONALD): Founder of the King's Daughters; b. in New York City Dec. 29, 1827; d. there Nov. 14, 1906. She was educated at a private school in Brooklyn, and in 1850 married the Rev. Frank Bottome. She had already become interested in religious and philanthropic work, and in 1876 began to give Bible talks in the homes of prominent New York women, continuing them for twenty-five years. In 1886 she organized the order of King's Daughters, basing her system on Edward Everett Hale's Ten Times One is Ten. In the following year the society was enlarged to include men, and the name was changed to the present International Order of the King's Daughters and Sons. In 1896 she was elected president of the women's branch of the International Medical Mission. She was also an associate editor of the The Ladies' Home Journal, and in addition to a few pamphlets and a large number of contributions to religious magazines wrote The Guest Chamber (New York, 1893); Crumbs from the King's Table (1894); and A Sunshine Trip to the Orient (1897).

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