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GENERAL INDEX TO SOZOMEN'S ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY.


 

Aadas, a presbyter, 391.

Abbos, a monk of Syria, 370.

Abdaleus, a Syrian monk, 370.

Abdas, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Abdiesus, a Persian deacon and martyr, 267.

Abedechalaas, a Persian presbyter and martyr, 266.

Abraham, 239; theophany, 261.

Abramius, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Acacians, 319; confirm formulary read at Ariminum, 319; depose Aetius and others, 320; development of their heresy, 324.

Acacius, bishop of Berea, 380; saintly character, 396; sent by Chrysostom an embassy to Rome, 400; becomes enemy of Chrysostom, 412.

Acacius, succeeds Eusebius as bishop of Cæsarea, 284, 294; participates in second council of Antioch, 285; deposed by Western bishops, 290; favors Aetian doctrines, 311; ejects Maximus, 315; deposed by council of Seleucia, 318; attends council of Antioch, 348.

Acacius, bishop of Tyre, Eunomian, 308.

Acacius, the martyr, church of, 198, 316.

Acepsimus, a Persian bishop, martyrdom of, under Sapor, 267.

Acesius, bishop of Novatians, repels Constantine's overtures, 256.

Achillas, presbyter of Alexandria, accepts doctrines of Arius, 251.

Æsculapius, temple of, destroyed, 262.

Aetianism, see Eunomianism.

Aetius, deacon at Antioch, 295, 298; doctrines, 307; recalled by Julian, 330.

Africanus, the historian, 240.

Agapius, Arian bishop of Ephesus, 388.

Agas, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Agdelas, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Agelius, Novatian bishop of Constantinople, 352; banished, but recalled, 352; takes no part in Paschal schism, 361; makes Sisinius his deputy, 382; death, 384.

Aithalas, Persian martyr, 267.

Aithals, Arian presbyter of Alexandria, 251.

Ajax, a monk of Majuma, 396.

Alaphion, 191; his family position and his life, 192; possessed by a demon, exorcised by Hilarion, became a Christian, 192, 233, 293.

Alaric, 197; rebukes luxury of Romans, 204; made a general through influence of Stilicho, 415, 421; plots with Stilicho, 415, 421; besieges Rome, 422; raises the siege, 423; again threatens the city, and takes it, 423; is made general, 423; makes Attalus king, 423; permits sack of Rome, 424.

Alavicus, a traitorous general of Honorius, 425.

Alexander, bishop of Alexandria, 204, 241; ejects Arius, after wavering in opinion, 251; attends Nicene council, 253; death, 269.

Alexander of Constantinople, overcomes opponent in argument by a miracle, 254; refuses to receive Arius into communion, 279, 280; death, succeeded by Paul, 284.

Alexion, Palestinian monk, 293.

Allegory, in interpreting Scripture, 205, 206.

Ambrose, 193, 209, 211; when governor, elevated to bishopric of Milan, 361; persecuted by Justina, 384; reproaches Theodosius, 394; obtains favor from Gratian, 394; orders deposition of Gerontius of Nicomedia, but is disobeyed, 403.

Ammon, the Egyptian, 365; becomes an ascetic, is carried across a brook by a miracle, miracle at his death, 250; character, 368.

Ammonius, a Palestinian monk, 370; successful appeal to Epiphanius for himself and the Long Brothers, 408; death, 410.

Amphilochius, rebukes Theodosius, 379; bishop of Iconium, 382.

Amphion, bishop of Epiphania, 246.

Amphion, becomes bishop of Nicomedia, 256; expelled by Eusebius, 268.

Analytical criticism of Sozomen, 227.

Anannias, a Persian martyr, 266.

Anastasia, daughter of Valens, 352.

Anastasius, bishop of Rome, 415; succeeded by Innocent, 415.

Andragathias, philosopher, instructor of Chrysostom, 399.

Andrathagius, secures death of Gratian, 384; death, 385.

Anomianism, see Eunomianism.

Anomians, 324.

Anthedon, maritime city of Palestine, 332.

Anthedonius, Palestinian monk, 293.

Anthemius, 196; influential, 197.

Anthropomorphism, see Corporeality.

Anthropomorphists, 206.

Antiochus, bishop of Ptolemias in Syria, 405.

Antiphonal singing, origin among the Arians, 404.

Antony the Great, an Egyptian monk, practices asceticism; his mode of life, 249; sees spirit of Ammon at latter's death, 250; visits Alexander, 270; seeks in vain recall of Athanasius, 280; maintains Nicene doctrine, 291; visited by Hilarion, 293; praises Didymus, 295; dream of, 349.

Anuph, Egyptian monk, 292.

Aones, monk of Syria, 370.

Apelles, an Egyptian ascetic, 365.

Aphrodite, temple and image of, on Mt. Calvary, 258; descent from Lebanon, 262.

Apocalypse, of Paul, 214; 390; tradition of its discovery, 390.

Apocalypse of Peter, 390.

Apolinarianism, opposed by Sozomen, 206; christology, 209; condemned by a council held at Rome, 262; geographical distribution, 364.

Apolinarius, bishop of Hierapolis, 340.

Apolinarius, bishop of Laodicea, 207; doctrine of, concerning the Holy Ghost, 359, 361; friendship for Athanasius, 362.

Apolinarius the Syrian, 269; learning and works, 340.

Apollo, statue of, destroyed at Daphne, 262; and temple, 342.

Apollonius, an Egyptian ascetic, 292.

Apollonius, another ascetic, 366.

Apollos, a monk of Thebais, 366.

Apostles, church of, at Constantinople, 198.

Apostolic succession, 217, 398.

Aquilinus, friend of Sozomen, 199; miraculously cured, 260.

Arcadius, Emperor of the West, succeeds Theodosius, 398; death, succeeded by Theodosius the Younger, 419.

Argo, the, 234.

Argobastes, 392; suicide, 393.

Argonauts, 234, 243.

Arian Goths, martyrs, 210.

Arianism, opposed by Sozomen, 206; divisions of, 217, 387; origin, 251; doctrines of, 251; re-agitated, 272; dispute not ended by death of Arius, 280; revival of, 281; again at death of Constantine, 283; defended by Acacians, 323; favored by Justina, 384.

Arians, inclined to liberal culture, 195; assert conspiracy to elect as bishop of Alexandria, 269; plot against Athanasius, 270; unite with the Melitians, 271; views of, 272; excite seditions on return of Athanasius, 284; secure expulsion of Paul from Constantinople, 284; successes of, 286; bishops displaced by Athanasius, 299; renew attacks on him, 304; persecute opponents, 322; translate Melitius to Antioch, 323; expel him thence, 322; persecute orthodox under Valens, 351-358; geographical distribution, 358; attempt to gain Theodosius, 379; divisions among, 388; disorderly conduct in Constantinople causes their repression, 404; disappointed in hopes of restoration under Attalus, 424.

Arius, 240; a presbyter of Alexandria, ordained deacon, defends Melitians, asserts his doctrines, 251; his following numerous, 251; appeal to bishops against Alexander, 252; gains a point with Paulinus, Eusebius, and Patrophilus, 252; summoned before bishops at Nicæa, 253; appears before the council, 254; loses his case and is banished, 255, and excommunicated, 255; recalled from exile, but forbidden to enter Alexandria, 268; submits, with Euzoius, statement of belief, and is reinstated, 277; but not received by bishop of Alexandria, 279; manner of death, 279.

Armenians, conversion of, 264.

Arsacius, bishop of Constantinople, 196; replaces Chrysostom, 413; personal character, 413; death, 417.

Arsacius, king of Armenia, 346.

Arsacius, pagan priest of Galatia, 338.

Arsacius, the Persian, 213; foretells earthquake at Nicomedia, 310; performs miracles, 311; death, 311.

Arsenius, 273, 275.

Arsion, monk of Scetis, 368.

Arsisius, an ascetic, 291, 368.

Ascalon, 233.

Ascetics, mode of life, 291, 293.

Ascholius, bishop of Thessalonica, 378; attends council of Constantinople, 380.

Asclepas, bishop of Gaza, 287; exiled, but recalled, 300.

Asphalius, Eunomian presbyter of Antioch, 308.

Asterius, general of the East under Honorius, 400.

Asterius, a sophist, 282; deposed, goes to Rome, 282.

Ataulphus, brother-in-law of Alaric, 423.

Athanaric, a Gothic leader, 210, 373; persecutes Christians, 374.

Athanasius the Great, bishop of Alexandria, 204; as deacon attends Nicene council, 253; becomes bishop on death of Alexander, 269; secretly ordained, 269; character, 269; baptized children when a child, 269; traduced by Arians before Constantine, 272; proves his innocence, is commended by the emperor, 273; is again assailed in vain, 273; again assailed, refuses to attend council of Cæsarea, 275; appears before council of Tyre, the charges, 275; is deposed, 276; appeals to Constantine, 278; who exiles him to Treves, 279; relates circumstances of death of Arius, 279; recalled to Alexandria by Constantine, 283; again deposed by council of Antioch, 285; escapes from Alexandria and flees to Rome, 286; received kindly there, 287; reinstated, 288; again ejected, 288; summoned to Rome by Julius, 288; affirms Nicene doctrine, 291; recalled by influence of Constans, 298; favors Eustathians, 299; displaces the Arian bishops, 299; commended by Synod of Jerusalem, 300; again deposed by Constantius, 301; again attacked by Arians, 304; condemned by council of Milan, 305; flees, 306; reappears after seven years' concealment, 330; attends council of Alexandria, 335; banished by Julian, 336; restored by Jovian, 349; flees again to escape Valens, 354; returns by Valens' permission, 354; death, 357; held consubstantiality of the Holy Ghost, 359.

Athanasius, bishop of Ancyra, 348; attends council of Tyana, 353.

Athanasius the historian, a source of Sozomen's history, 222.

Attalus, made king by Alaric, 423; acts haughtily toward Honorius, 424; abdicates and leaves Rome, 424; baptized by Sigesarius, bishop of the Goths, 424.

Atticus, bishop of Constantinople, 196, 213; character and tendencies, 417.

Aurelius, Palestinian monk, 293.

Auxentius, bishop of Milan, an Arian, 291, 294, 312, 313, 361; condemned by council of Rome, 360; death, 361.

Auxentius, son of Addas, a presbyter, 391.

Azadanes, a Persian martyr, 267.

Azades, a Persian martyr, 266.

Azizus, a monk of Syria, 370.

 

Babylas, martyr of Antioch, 341.

Baptism, and the Catholic Church, 207; Eunomian doctrine of, 207, 363.

Barbasymes, Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Bardasanes, 295.

Barges, Syrian monk, 370.

Barses, Syrian monk and honorary bishop, 371.

Basil the Great, limited use by Sozomen, 223; praise of Ephraem Syrus, 295.

Basil, bishop of Ancyra, repudiated by Western bishops, 290, 294; again acquires bishopric, 301; refutes Photinus at council of Sirmium, 303; opposes Eudoxus, 308; advises council at Nicæa, 311; deposed by Acacians, 320; charges against him, 320; martyrdom, 334.

Basil, bishop of Cæsarea, 355; miraculous powers, 356; friendship for Gregory, 356; opposes Arianism, 356; doctrine of, concerning Holy Ghost, 359.

Basiliscus, martyr, appears to Chrysostom, 202, 418.

Battheus, Syrian monk, 370, 371.

Benjamin, ascetic philosopher, 366.

Benus, an Egyptian ascetic, 365.

Berytus, 196; law school at, 234 n.

Bethelia, 191; population mixed, 192; and large, with stately churches, 233; in biography, 198, 370.

Bibliography of Sozomen, 225- 231.

Bochres, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Breviary (or epitome) of ecclesiastical affairs by Sozomen, lost, 200, 234.

Busiris, a Galatian martyr, 334.

Buthericus, a general, 394.

Byzantium, 251.

 

Cæsarea, reduced by Julian from rank of a city, 329.

Cæsarius, and tomb of forty martyrs, 420.

Calemerus, finds relics of prophet Zechariah, 427.

Callinicus, bishop of Pellusium, 275.

Callicinus, a Melitian bishop and accuser of Athanasius, 275.

Carosa, daughter of Valens, 352.

Carpones, presbyter, an Arian of Alexandria, 251.

Carterius, philosopher, instructor of Chrysostom, 399.

Cassianus, a deacon, 416.

Catholic Church the orthodox church, 205; unity of, 258; unites with Novatians in Constantinople, 316; persecution under Valens, 357.

Cecropius, bishop of Nicomedia, killed in earthquake, 310.

Celibacy, favored by Constantine, 245; not enforced by council of Nicæa, 256.

Celts, christianization of, 262.

Cenobite, community at Tabenna, 292.

Chalcedon, church in, 199.

Chrestus, becomes bishop of Nicæa, 256; expelled, 268.

Christ, sufferings typified by Isaac, coming predicted by Jacob, miraculous conception, so-called by Josephus, 239; appears to Constantine, 241; name of, casts out demons, 262.

Christianity, spread of, under Constantine, 261, 262.

Chrysostom, 196, 399; method of interpreting Scripture, 206; personal character, 399; dissuades Theodore of Mopsuestia from marriage, 399; elected bishop of Constantinople, 400; opposed by Theophilus in vain, 400; purifies the clergy, 400; strives to re-unite the churches of the West and the East, 400; foils plans of Gaïnas, 401; prudence in governing the Church, 402; miracle during his administration, 403; deposes thirteen bishops in Asia, 403; ordains Heraclides bishop of Ephesus, 403; expels Gerontius, bishop of Nicomedia, 403; ordains Pansophius instead, 403; incurs enmity of the clergy, 404; rebukes Olympias for unwise almsgiving, 405; disputes with monk Isaac, 405; expels Severian from Constantinople, 405; is reconciled by the empress, 405; cautiously receives the Egyptian monks, 407; goes to receive Epiphanius, but is repulsed, 408; refuses to expel the "Long Brothers," 409; excites the enmity of the empress, 409; cited to appear at counci of Rufinianæ, 410; declines to do so, and is deposed, 410; withdraws, and a sedition arises against the council, 410; which causes his recall, 411; when he delivers an oration, 411; is more than ever liked by the people, 412; justified by a council of sixty bishops, 411; again offending the empress, is again deposed, 412; is expelled, holds meetings outside the city, 412; attacks on his life, 413; is guarded by the people, 413; exiled to Armenia, 413; cause espoused by Innocent, bishop of Rome, 416; receives letter from Innocent, 417; reputation during his exile, 417; is banished to a remoter place, dies on the way, 418.

Church and State, 208; in persecution, 210; united, 244.

Churches restored, 245.

Cilix, presbyter of Tarsus, 199.

Clemens, Alexandrinus, scholarship, 194, 240.

Clergy, ascetic character of, in Sozomen's time, 194; exempted from taxation, 246; appeal to bishops from civil courts allowed, 246; support of, 329.

Codex Gregorianus, 196; a source of Sozomen's history, 223.

Codex Hermogenianus, 196; a source of Sozomen's history, 223.

Codex Theodosianus, proclaimed a.d. 439, 196; a source of Sozomen's history, 223.

Commissioner of penance, origin of office, 386; suppression, 386.

Conciliar movement, in West, 217, 312-315; in East, 217, 315-317.

Confession of faith, of bishops of the East, 289; three formularies of Council of Sirmium, 303; Valentian formulary, 315; of Ariminum, 322; of Eustathius, etc., 352.

Constans, son of Constantine the Great, obtains empire of the West, 284; writes to Constantius in re Athanasius and Paul, 289; receives three bishops and dismisses them, 289; fails to have Athanasius and Paul reinstated, 289; summons Synod of Sardica, 289; threatens brother with war unless Athanasius restored, 298; killed in Gaul, 301.

Constans, son of Constantine the Usurper, 425; slain, 427.

Constantia, sister of Constantine, advocates restoration of Arius and Euzoius, 277.

Constantine the Great, sees vision of cross and of Christ, 241; inquires of priests, who expound the Scriptures, takes cross as his standard, which protects the bearer, 242; charged with murdering son Crispus, 242; but charge untrue, 243; churches flourish under him, 243; conquers Dardanians, 243; overcomes Licinius, becomes sole emperor, makes Christianity state religion, revokes edicts against Christians, pagan worship prohibited, 244; property restored to Christians, 244; conquers Goths and Sarmatians, enjoins observance of Lord's Day, abolishes crucifixion, 245; abolishes law against celibacy, 245; exempts clergy from taxation, allows appeal to bishops from civil courts, 246; grants request of Eutychianus, 251; rebukes Arius and Alexander, 252; is grieved at Paschal controversy, 252; sends Hosius to reconcile differences, 253; convenes council at Nicæa, 253; burns memorials and exhorts to peace, 253; replies to Eusebius' eulogy, 254; attempts to reconcile the Novatians, 256; entertains the council, exhorts to harmony, and writes to the churches, 257; orders church built near Calvary, 258; has bit made out of true nails, 259; erects temples, 259; beautifies Byzantium and changes its name, 260; builds church at Hestiæ, or Michælium, 260; orders church erected under oak of Mamre, 261; orders pagan shrines and idols destroyed and places purified, 261; receives embassy of Iberians, 264; remonstrates with Sapor for persesecuting Christians, 268; hears traducers of Athanasius, 272; but dismisses them, 273; convenes council of Cæsarea, 275; orders consecration of the Great Martyrium at Jerusalem, 276; is persuaded by Constantia to restore Arius and Euzoius, 277; writes letter to Synod of Tyre, 278; exiles Athanasius to Treves, 279; refuses to recall him, 280; exiles John, the Melitian bishop, 280; enacts law against heresies, 280; baptism, death, and character, 282; charges Constantius to call council regarding homoiousios, 298; body removed by Macedonius, 316.

Constantine, son of Constantine the Great, death of, at Aquileia, 284.

Constantine, proclaimed emperor by soldiers, 425; sends son Constans into Spain, 427; proclaims him emperor, 427; killed, 427.

Constantine, a city of Phœnicia, 262.

Constantinople, churches in, 199.

Constantius, father of Constantine the Great, 205; protects Christians, 243; tests the faithful, 243.

Constantius, son and successor of Constantine, recalls Athanasius, 283; letter to church of Alexandria, 283; obtains empire of the East, 284; goes to Antioch of Syria, 285; adopts the term "homoiousios," 297; convenes council of Ariminum, 298; restores Athanasius, 298; commends him to bishops of Egypt, 299; overcomes Vetranius, 302; and Maxentius, 304; goes to Rome, attempts to force homoiousios on church, 304; banishes Liberius, 307; condemns Eudoxius and the Aetians, 309; convenes council at Nicæa, 311; goes to Ariminum, council meets there, 312; permits another at Seleucia, 312; slights deputies from council of Ariminum, 314; appoints Julian, Cæsar, 316; death, 325.

Constantius, a general of Honorius, 426, 427.

Consubstantiality of Son, broached, 251; defended by Alexander of Alexandria against Arius, 251; becomes the faith of the church, 255; dispute over meaning of word, 270; evaded by partisans of Eusebius of Nicomedia, 285; affirmed by the West, 291; homoousios and homoiousios, 297; debated at Sirmium, 303; and at Seleucia, 317; and at Ariminum, 319; attacked anew by Acacians, 323; Macedonian acceptation of the term, 336; Nicene statement affirmed by council of Antioch, 348; accepted by Macedonian bishops, 352; afterwards rejected by them, 377.

Copres, an Egyptian monk, 365.

Corporeality of God, question raised in Egypt, 406.

Council of Alexandria, 209; reaffirms Nicene doctrines, 335. Antioch, 207; deposes Eustathius, 270; ordains Euphronius bishop, 271; second council, 285; deposes Athanasius, ordains Gregory, 285. Antioch in Syria, 348; reaffirms Nicene faith, 348; letter to Jovian, 348. Ariminum, convened, 298; cause, 298; second council, convened, 312; rejects Aetian doctrines, 313; sends report to Constantius, 313; confirming Nicene doctrines, 314. Cæsarea, to try Athanasius, who does not appear, 275. Constantinople, 209; convened by Theodosius, 380; chooses Nectarius bishop of Constantinople, 381; affirms Nicene faith, 381; establishes precedence of Rome, and rank of see of Constantinople, 381. Jerusalem, 299; letter in behalf of Athanasius, 299. Lampsacus, 350; holds Arian doctrines, 350. Milan, deposes and banishes Athanasius, 305. Nicæa, convened, 253; assembled, 254; condemns Arianism, 255; leaves celibacy unenforced, 256; enacts canons, 256. Rome, 360; reaffirms Nicene doctrines, condemns Auxentius of Milan, 360; circular letter of, 360. Rufinianæ, 409; the eighty monks reconciled with Theophilus, 410; cite Chrysostom and clergy of Constantinople to appear, 410; depose Chrysostom, 410; mobbed by the people, 410. Sardica, 209; East separates from West, 289; numbers attending, 290. Seleucia, 316; two formularies offered, 316; reaffirms formulary of council of Antioch, 318; deposes various bishops, 318. Sirmium, convened, 302; deposes Photinus, 303; three formularies of faith, 303. Tyana, 353; reaffirms Nicene doctrines, 353. Tyre, assembles without being convened by the emperor, 275; deposes Athanasius, and declares reasons to Constantine, 276; restores and re-establishes the Melitian bishop, John, 280.

Councils, imperial convocation defended, 208.

Crispion (also "Chrispion"), archdeacon, a monk of Bethelia, in Palestine, 191, 370; Ephanius' archdeacon, 233; brother of Fuscon and Salamanus, 233, 408.

Crispus, son of Constantine, murder of, 242.

Cronius, an ascetic, 291; called Cronion, 368.

Cross, appearance of, to Constantine, 241; near Jerusalem, 302.

Crucifixion, as punishment, abolished, 245.

Cyriacus, bishop of Adama, 382.

Cyriacus, a deacon, 416.

Cyril, bishop of Jerusalem, 294; succeeds Maximus, 302, 315; deposed by Acasians, 321; renounces Macedonian doctrines and attends council of Constantinople, 380; death, 385.

Cyrinus, bishop of Chalcedon, abuses Chrysostom at council of Chalcedon, 409; death, 409.

Cyrus, of Constantinople, 194.

 

Damasus, bishop of Rome, 359; condemns Apolinarianism, 362; death, 398.

Daniel, a Syrian monk, 293.

Dansus, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Daphne, at Antioch, 234; customs of, 341; temple and statue of Apollo destroyed, 342.

Democritus of Coös, 274.

Demophilus, Arian bishop of Constantinople, 354; leader of the Arians, 378; leaves the city, 379; holds service with Lucius outside Constantinople, 379; death, 385.

Dianius, bishop of Cappadocian Cæsarea, attends second council of Antioch, 285.

Didymus, of Alexandria, 294; character, 295; foresees Julian's death, 347; renown, 358, 368.

Didymus, a relative of the Emperor Honorius, 425.

Diodorus, bishop of Tarsus, 380, 381; instructor of Chrysostom, 399; avoided allegory in interpretation, 206, 399.

Diogenes, deacon, 320.

Dionysius, bishop of Alba, 305.

Dionysius, a monk of Rhinocorura, 369.

Dionysius, temple of, at Alexandria, destroyed, 385.

Dioscorus, an Egyptian monk, 365, 368; made bishop of Hermopolis, 406; incurs enmity of Theophilus, 406; retires to Scythopolis, 407; appeals to empress, 407, 410; death, 410.

Diospolis, bishopric of, 271.

Divination, by wooden tripod, 391.

Dominica, wife of Emperor Valens, 377.

Donatist, practice regarding the excommunicated, 208.

Donatus, bishop of Eurœa, 394; slays a dragon, 395.

Dorotheus, Arian bishop of Constantinople, 385; heads one party of the Arians, 388.

Dorotheus, bishop of Antioch, succeeds Euzoius, 374.

Dorotheus, an ascetic of Thebes, 366.

Dracontius, bishop of Pergamos, deposed by Acacians, 320.

 

Easter controversy, 216; Novatian and Sabbatian position, 388.

Eastern Christians, 241.

Eastern church, and schism of Sardica, 290, 291; mainly Arian, 377.

Ecdicius, slayer of Edovicus, 426.

Edesius, adventures in India, 274.

Edessa, 193, 293; devotion of Christians of, 357.

Edicts against Christians revoked, 244.

Editions of Sozomen, 225, 226.

Edovicus, a general of the usurper Constantine, 426.

Egyptian monasticism, 292, 365-369.

Eleusius, bishop of Cyzicus, 308; deposed by Acacians, 320; embraces heresy of Macedonius, 322, 336; compelled by Julian to build Novatian church, 330; expelled by Julian, 336; recants before Valens, but repents, 351; attends council of Constantinople, 380.

Elias, associate of Patrines, 273.

Elias, an Egyptian ascetic, 365.

Elpidius, bishop of Satala, deposed by Acacians, 321.

Emesa, church of, 297.

Empedocles, death of, 274.

Encratites, 206, 334.

Ephraem Syrus, 216, 293, 370; literary works, 295; personal character, 296.

Epiphanies of angels, saints, etc., 202.

Epiphanius, bishop of Salamis, controversy with the empress, 191, 408; prophecies of, 213; duped by Theophilus, acts against Chrysostom, 408; is dissuaded from this course by Serapion, 408; meets "Long Brothers" and is reconciled to them, 409; death, 409.

Epiphanius, monk of Palestine, 369; afterward bishop of Salamis, 370; liberality and miracles, 395.

Epiphanius, the sophist, 362.

Episcopal and presbyterial jurisdiction, 390.

Erennius, becomes bishop of Jerusalem, 324; is succeeded by Heraclius, 324.

Eucherius, son of Stilicho, 421; death, 422.

Eudocia, Empress, 194; liberal tendencies, 197.

Eudoxia, daughter of Eudocia, liberal tendencies, 197; married Valentinian III., 200; death, 417.

Eudoxius, bishop of Germanicia, afterwards of Constantinople, attends second council of Antioch, 285.

Eudoxius, Eunomian bishop of Antioch, 308; ejected and condemned by Constantius, 309; and deposed by council of Seleucia, 318; usurps bishopric of Constantinople, 321; opposes Nicene doctrine, 322; gains over Yalens, 351; death, 354.

Eudoxus, bishop of Nicæa, 205.

Eugenius, bishop of Nicæa, 304.

Eugenius, attempts to usurp throne of the West, 392; death, 393.

Eulalius, orthodox bishop of Amasia, 377.

Eulogius, Egyptian presbyter and monk, 365.

Eulogius, Persian monk and honorary bishop, 370.

Eunomianism, genesis of, 217, 363; doctrines, 307, 363; prominence and condemnation, 309; favor by Julian, 330; origin, 363; attributed to Aetius by Eunomius, 364; geographical distribution, 364.

Eunomians, 207; baptism among, 207, 363; not tolerated by Gratian, 377.

Eunomius, 207; Arian bishop of Cyzicus, 351; his heresy not new, 363; acknowledges indebtedness to Aetius, 364; described by Gregory Nazianzen, 364; secedes from Arians, 379; banished by Theodosius, dies, 387, 388.

Euphronius, ordained bishop of Antioch, 271; succeeded by Placetus, 285, 298.

Euplus, Melitian bishop, 275.

Eupsychius, martyr of Cæsarea, 334.

Eusebia, guardian of the Forty Martyrs, 420.

Eusebius, bishop of Cæsarea, 275; attends council of Tyana, 353; difficulties and reconciliation with Basil, 355; death, 355.

Eusebius Emesenus, bishop of Emesa, life, 286, 294.

Eusebius of Nicomedia, sides with Arius against Alexander, 252; pretends to repudiate him, 255; is deposed, 256; expels Amphion, 268; endeavors to reinstate Arius, 270; charged by Eustathius with Arianism, 270; again plots to restore Arius, threatens Alexander of Constantinople, 279; death of Arius foils plan, 279; at death of Constantine favors Arianism, 283.

Eusebius, bishop of Samosata, 348.

Eusebius, bishop of Vercella, 305; returns from exile to council of Alexandria, 335; maintains Nicene doctrines, 335.

Eusebius, a eunuch, chamberlain to Constantius, 283; aids Aetians, 312.

Eusebius, governor of the court, executed, 330.

Eusebius, a martyr of Gaza, 332.

Eusebius, one of the "Long Brothers," Egyptian monk, 368.

Eusebius Pamphilus, the historian, one source of Sozomen's history, 222; story of Constantine's vision of the cross, 241; sides with Arius against Alexander, 252; attends Nicene council and eulogizes Constantine, 254; after delay, sanctions decision reached, 255; censured concerning the oak of Mamre, 261; recommended for see of Antioch, 270; death, succeeded by Acacius, 284.

Eusebius, a Syrian monk, 370.

Eustathians, favored by Athanasius, 299; numerous in Antioch, 299; adherents of Nicene doctrines, 323; same as the Catholics, 358.

Eustathius, bishop of Berœa, then of Antioch, 241; attends Nicene Council, 253; disputes with Eusebius Pamphilus concerning consubstantiality, 270; deposed by council of Antioch, 270; character, 271.

Eustathius, bishop of Sebaste, ascetic, 293; opposes Eudoxius, 308; deposed by Acacians, 320; accepts heresy of Macedonius, 322, 336; goes to Rome, adopts Nicene doctrine, 352; exiled by Valens, 355.

Eutropia, mother-in-law of Constantine, 261.

Eutropius, a eunuch, 392; becomes consul, 403; refuses refuge of churches to fugitives, falls victim to his own order, 404.

Eutropius, a reader of Alexandria, 414; suffers death, 414.

Eutychean heresy, 201, 387.

Eutychianus, a Novatian of Bithynia, performs a miracle, 251.

Eutychus, a Eunomian, doctrine of, 387.

Euzoius, deacon of Alexandria, becomes an Arian, 251; having been deposed, is reinstated in company with Arius, 277; stirs up dissension, 335; as bishop of Antioch, opposes Athanasius, 349; seizes Peter of Alexandria, 357; death, 374; succeeded by Dorotheus, 374.

Evagrius, archdeacon of Constantinople, 369; becomes an ascetic, 369.

Evagrius, bishop of Antioch, 385; death, 401.

Evagrius, orthodox bishop of Constantinople, 354; exiled by Valens, 355.

Evagrius, the historian, 191.

Exucontians, 324.

 

Fatherhood of God, Arian discussion concerning, 388.

Fathers' creed final, 205.

Felix, bishop of Rome, 204; adheres to Nicene faith, 307.

Flacilla, wife of Theodosius, holds Nicene faith, 379.

Flavian, pagan and pæetorian prefect, 392.

Flavian, presbyter, afterwards bishop of Antioch, 362, 382, 398; appeases wrath of Theodosius, 393: dispute with bishop of Rome, 400; succeeded by Porphyry, 415.

Flavita, barbarian general in Roman army, defeats Gaïnas, becomes consul, 402.

Forty Martyrs, discovery of remains, 196; prior to a.d. 439, 201; story of discovery, 420; description of the tomb, 421.

Frumentius, missionary to India, youthful adventures of, and subsequent ordination as bishop of India, 274.

 

Gaddanus, a Syrian monk, 370.

Gaddiabes, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Gainas, an Arian, 197, 205.

Gaïnas, a Goth, attempts to seize the throne, 401; lays aside pretensions and is made general, 401; espouses Arian cause, is foiled by Chrysostom, 401; attempts to cross to Asia and perishes, 402.

Galileans, a name of the Christians, 329, 338.

Galla Placidia, sister of Honorius, 427.

Gallus, 295; made Cæsar, 302; resides at Ephesus, 327; death, 327.

Gallienus, 262.

Gaudentius, 290.

Gauls, christianization of, 262.

Gaza, dissension between G. and Majuma, 195, 198; martyrology, 198, 332; Sozomen's grandfather esteemed there, 233.

George, bishop of Alexandria, persecutes opponents, 302, 306; attends council of Sirmium, 303; deposed by council of Seleucia, 318; reinstated by Acacians, persecutes pagans and opposing Christians, 324; meets violent death, 331.

George, bishop of Laodicea in Syria, 285; deposed by bishops of West, 290; reinstated, opposes Eudoxius of Antioch, 308; ejection of Apolinarius causes Apolinarian heresy, 362.

George of Arethusa, nominated for bishopric of Antioch, 271.

Germanus, presbyter, 416.

Gerontius, a physician, becomes bishop of Nicomedia, 403; deposed by Chrysostom, 403.

Gerontius, a traitorous general of Honorius, 426.

Gladiatorial shows prohibited, 245.

Goths, christianization of the, 262, 373; become Arians, 373; follow the Psathyrians, 388.

Gratian, emperor, 209; toleration edict of, 210, 377; associates Theodosius with self in empire, 377.

Gratian, proclaimed emperor by soldiers, soon afterwards slain, 425.

Gregory, bishop of Alexandria, 285; attends second council of Antioch, 285; repudiated by bishops of the West, 290.

Gregory, bishop of Nyssa, 382.

Gregory Nazianzen, 193, 199; a source for Sozomen, 223; hated by Julian, 340; attends council of Tyana, 353; becomes bishop of Nazianzus, 356; and of Constantinople, 356; doctrine of, concerning the Holy Ghost, 359; describes Apolinarianism and Eunomianism, 364; leader of orthodox, 378; translated to Constantinople, abdicates, 380.

 

Habakkuk, relics of, discovered, 397.

Halas, a Syrian monk, 370, 371.

Harmonius, 295, 296.

Hegesippus, 240.

Helena, mother of Constantine, 204; goes to Jerusalem, seeks true cross, 258; erects temples at Bethlehem and on Mount of Olives, visits churches of the East, is proclaimed empress, dies at age of eighty, 259.

Helenopolis in Bithynia, 259.

Helenopolis in Palestine, 259.

Heliodorus, a Syrian monk, 370.

Heliopolis, persecution of Christians in, 333.

Helladius, bishop of Cæsarea in Cappadocia, 382; ordains Gerontius, 403.

Helladius, deacon of Alexandria, becomes an Arian, 251.

Helles, an Egyptian ascetic, 365.

Hemona, building of, 234.

Heortasius, bishop of Sardis, deposed by Acacians, 320.

Heraclean, general under Honorius, 423; causes famine in Rome, 424.

Heraclides, Egyptian ascetic, 291, 358.

Heraclides, monk of Scetis, ordained bishop of Ephesus, 403.

Heraclius, succeeds Erennius as bishop of Jerusalem, 324; is succeeded by Hilarius, 324.

Hercules, purified, 243.

Hermaeon, a Melitian bishop, 275.

Hermias, a common Christian name, 191.

Hermogenes, prefect of Syria, 320.

Hermopolis, in the Thebais, 343.

Herod the Great, 239.

Hestiae, called Michaelium, 196, 198; church built by Constantine, 260.

Hesychas, Palestinian monk, 293; "Hesycas," 369.

Hilarion, life of, 192, 293, 333; exorcises Alaphion, 192, 233; activity in Palestine, a.d. 345, 192, 293; death, 371; burial, 293.

Hilarius, bishop of Jerusalem after Heraclius, 324.

Hilary of Pictavium, 193, 295; exiled, 3O5.

Himerius, sophist of Athens, 356.

Historiography of Sozomen, 228.

Holy Ghost, doctrine of, two parties, 359.

Homoousians, 209, 297, 298.

Homoousios and homoiousios, 297, 298.

Honoria, daughter of the general Constantius, 427.

Honorius, 205; date of death of, a.d. 423, 217; succeeds Theodosius, 398; offers to acknowledge Attalus as co-emperor, 423; rebellions against him, 425; which he overcomes, 427.

Hormisdas, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Hosius, bishop of Cordova, 246; sent to settle Paschal controversy, 253; expands Nicene creed, 290.

Huns, 398, 415; retreat from Thrace, 422.

Hypatian, bishop of Heraclia, 350.

Hypostasis, 255, 270, 289, 320, 335, 381.

 

Iberians, of Asia, converted by a slave, assisted by miracles, 263; send ambassadors to Constantine, 264.

Impeccability, 386.

India, Christianization of, 274.

Indifferent canon, 389.

Innocent, bishop of Rome, 415; writes Chrysostom, 416.

Irene, daughter of Spyridon, wonderful story of, 246.

Irenius, bishop of Gaza, 348.

Isaac, a Melitian bishop, 275.

Isaac, a monk, predicts death of Valens, 376; disputes with Chrysostom, 405.

Isaac, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Isaac, a type of sufferings of Christ, 239.

Isaiah, 343.

Ischurias, a Melitian presbyter, 275.

Ischyrion, bishop of Mareotis, appointed by Eastern bishops, 290.

Ishmael, father of the Saracens, 375.

Isidore, an Egyptian monk, 365.

Isidore, a presbyter of Alexandria, 400; sent on embassy to Rome, 400; incurs enmity of Theophilus, 406.

Isidore of Pelusium, 191.

 

Jacob, predicted coming of Christ, 239.

Jews, the, rejection of Christ, 240; conspire with Magi against Persian Christians, 264, 266; laws regarding slave-holding, 297; granted permission to rebuild the Temple, 343; repulsed by fire issuing from the earth, 398.

Johannists, or Johnites, followers of John Chrysostom of Constantinople, 201, 413; persecuted, 413, 414; excommunicated, 415.

John Baptist, head found, conveyed to Constantinople, and church built over it, 199, 391; miracles there, 393.

John, bishop of Constantinople, 196, 212; predictions of, 213, 409.

John, bishop of Jerusalem, 398.

John Chrysostom, see Chrysostom.

John, Egyptian ascetic, 365.

John, a Melitian bishop, 271, 275; exiled by Constantine, 280.

John, a monk of Thebais, 392; predicts death of Theodosius and of Eugenius, 392.

John, a Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

John, presbyter and monk, 366.

Joseph, husband of Mary, 343.

Josephus, the historian, witness of, to Christ, 239.

Jovian, 207, 209; proclaimed emperor, 347; restores privileges to Christians, 348; restores Athanasius, 349; death, 349.

Jovius, prefect of Italy, 423.

Julian, the apostate, edicts cause flight of Sozomen's family and of Alaphion's, 192; portents during reign, 205; infatuation, 206: murder of, defended, 209, 346; dread of him, 210; named Cæsar, 317; is proclaimed Augustus, and apostatises, 325, 326; family and education, 326; studies philosophy at Constantinople, 327; relations with Constantius, 327; reopens pagan temples, 328; refuses help to Nisibis, 328; subjects Majuma to Gaza, 328; withdraws immunities from clergy, 329; hatred of the church, 330; recalls Aetius, 330; compels rebuilding of Novatian church, 330; banishes Athanasius and Eleusius, 336; expels the clergy, 336; failure to reinstate paganism, 337; further efforts, 338; testimony to Christian benevolence, 338; letter to Arsacius, 338; artful measures against Christians, 339; forbids public education and Greek classics to Christians, 340; writes his "Aversion to Beards," 341; orders body of Babylas removed, 341; persecution resulting, 342; destroys a statue of Christ, 342; permits Jews to rebuild the Temple, 343; makes war on Persia, 345; insults Arsacius, King of Armenia, 345; death, 346; cause of his death, 346; his impiety, 347.

Julian, the Chaldaean, performs a miracle, 254.

Julian, governor of Egypt, 331; uncle of above, 331; horrible death, 332.

Julian, Syrian monk, 293.

Julius, bishop of Rome, absent from Nicene council, 253; rebukes bishops of East, secures reinstatement of Athanasius and Paul, 287; summons Athanasius to Rome, 288; replies to letter of bishops of council of Antioch, 288; appeals to Constans, 289; death, 304.

Julius, a deacon of Alexandria, and an Arian, 251.

Justina, revival of Arianism, 211; attempts to force its adoption by threats, 384; flees with Valentinian II. to Thessalonica, 384; death, 385.

 

Lagodius, a relative of the Emperor Honorius, 425.

Lazarus, a Syrian monk and bishop, 370, 371.

Leontius, bishop of Ancyra, 371; deprived Novatians of churches, 399; attends council which deposed Chrysostom, 412.

Leontius, bishop of Antioch, 298; succeeded by Eudoxius, 308.

Leontius, presbyter to Constantius, 308.

Libanius, the Syrian, 209, 356; teacher of Chrysostom, 399.

Liberius, bishop of Rome, 204, 207; succeeds Julius, 304; exiled by Constantius, 307; recalled, 309; receives Macedonian bishops, 352; death, 359.

Licinius, 241; persecutes Christians, 244; deceived by oracle, loses battle, and dies in Thessalonica, 244.

Literature upon Sozomen, 228- 231.

Logos, the, 239.

"Long Brothers," the, 368; incur enmity of Theophilus, 406; retire with other monks to Scythopolis, 407.

Lord's day, observed by Constantine, 245.

Lucianius, martyr of Nicomedia, 285.

Lucifer, founder of Luciferian heresy, 295; bishop of Cagliari, 335.

Lucius, bishop of Adrianople, deposed, lives in Rome, 287; reinstated, 300; again deposed; dies in prison, 301.

Lucius, presbyter of Alexandria, 349; made bishop by Arians, 357; attempts persecution of the ascetics, 358; reproached by Moses, 374; expelled, flees to Constantinople, 379.

 

Maares, Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Macarius, bishop of Jerusalem, 241, 246; attends Nicene council, 253; discovers true cross, 259; chided by Constantine because of oak of Mamre, 261; succeeded by Maximus, 271.

Macarius, deacon of Alexandria, an Arian, 251.

Macarius, presbyter of Alexandria, 291, 358, 366.

Macarius, presbyter of Celliae, 207, 366.

Macarius Politicus, ascetic and presbyter, 291.

Macedonius, 198; church built by M., 199; candidate for bishopric, 284; gains possession, 288; ejected on return of Paul, 300; again seizes bishopric, persecutes Paulinists, 210, 301, 315; expelled by Acacians, 322; death, 322; heresy of, regarding the Holy Ghost, 322.

Macedonius, a Phrygian martyr, 334.

Macedonian heresy, 322; peculiarity, 336.

Macedonians, hold councils, 336; persecuted by Valens, 352; send embassy to Rome, 352; invited to council of Constantinople, but withdraw, 380; decline of, 398.

Magi, of Persia, malign the Christians, 264; stir up persecution, 265, 266.

Magnentius, usurps power of Constans, 301; defeated by Constantius, commits suicide, 304.

Magnus, treasurer under Valens, 357.

Majuma, seaport of Gaza, 195; dissention between Majuma and Gaza, 195, 198; sudden conversion of inhabitants, name changed to Constantia, 262; degraded by Julian, 328.

Malachion, a monk of Bethelia in Palestine, 191, 233; death, 193; miraculous disappearance and reappearance, 370.

Mammas, the martyr, 326.

Mamre, oak of, church built by Constantine under, 261.

Mania (Mavia), Phylarch of the Saracens, 374; succors Constantinople, 377.

Manichæans, not tolerated by Gratian, 377.

Manumission of slaves facilitated, 246.

Manuscripts of Sozomen, 225.

Marathonius, convent of, in Constantinople, 199, 315; made bishop of Nicomedia, 315; adopts heresy of Macedonius, 322.

Marcellinus, mention of story of Stephen, 224.

Marcellus, bishop of Ancyra, his doctrines, 281; deposed by Synod of Constantinople, 281; reinstated by Synod of Sardis, 282, 300; again deposed, 301.

Marcellus, bishop of Apamea, Syria, 386; death, 386.

Marcian, Macedonian bishop of Lampsacus, 380.

Marcian, Novatian presbyter of Constantinople, 352; becomes bishop, 384; regrets ordination of Sabbatius, 388; death, 398.

Marcian, singer and martyr of Constantinople, 301.

Marcionites, 280.

Mardonius, a eunuch, 391.

Mareas, Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Marinus, succeeds Demophilus, superseded by Marinus, 385; heads the Psathyrians, 388.

Maris, bishop of Chalcedon, repudiates Arianism, 255; joins the Acacians, 319; boldness, 329.

Mark, bishop of Arethusa, 289, 308, 311; attends council of Sirmium, 302; compiles formulary, 317; martyrdom, 333.

Mark, bishop of Rome, succeeds Silvester, succeeded by Julius, 271.

Mark, a deposed presbyter, 275.

Mark, a monk, 207, 366.

Mark, proclaimed emperor by soldiers, soon afterwards slain, 425.

Marosas, monk of Persia, 371.

Martin, bishop of Tarracinæ, 294.

Martyrius, bishop of Marcianopolis, 382.

Martyrius, a physician, refuses diaconate, 382.

Martyrius, sub-deacon and martyr, 301.

Maruthas, causes death of Cyrinus, 409.

Mary, called mother of God, 343.

Matrona, guardian of head of John Baptist, 391.

Maximus, Alexandrian philosopher, 381; episcopal ordination of, declared invalid, 381.

Maximus, bishop of Jerusalem, 213, 246; succeeds Macarius, 271.

Maximus, bishop of Seleucia, 399; schoolfellow of Chrysostom, 399.

Maximus, bishop of Treves, deposed by Eastern bishops after schism of Sardica, 290.

Maximus, Ephesian philosopher, 327.

Maximus, usurper set up by Gerontius, 426.

Maximus, usurps Valentinian's throne, 384; death, 386.

Melas, bishop of Rhinocorura, 369.

Meletius, appointed by Acacians bishop of Sebaste, 322; translated to Antioch, 323; upholds Nicene doctrine, and is expelled, 323; returns to Antioch, 335; attends council of Antioch, 348; banished by Valens, 351; returns to Antioch, causing dissension, 378; attends council of Constantinople, 380; burial, 382.

Melitians, plead for Arius with Athanasius, 270; unite with the Arians, 271; views of, 272; traduce Athanasius before Constantine, but fail, 272; second attempt, which also fails, 273.

Melitius, bishop of Lycus, his heresy, 251; examined by council at Nicæa, power of ordination withdrawn, 256; nominates John as his successor, 271.

Menivolus, secretary to Justina, 384.

Meropius, journey to India, 274.

Method of Sozomen in composition, 213-217; chronological method, 215, 216.

Micah, relics of, discovered, 397.

Michælium, see Hestiæ.

Missions, 211.

Mithrium, scene of, riot, 331.

Mocius, Persian bishop and martyr, 267, 410.

Modestus, prefect of Antioch in Syria, 357.

Monasticism, 212; immoralities of, omitted, 213; praised, 216; philosophy, 233, 247; monastic life, 248, 369; origin of, attributed to John Baptist and Elias, the prophet, 248; among Hebrews, 248, 293; among Egyptians, 292; and Syrians, 293, 370; in Palestine, 369.

Monks, Syrian and Persian, 213; Egyptian, 248.

Montanism, 206.

Montanus, 270.

Moses, presbyter and monk of Scetis, 367; reproaches Lucius, 374; refuses ordination by latter, 374.

Mysteries, 245, 248.

 

Narcissus, bishop of Irenopolis, 289; deposed by Western bishops, 290; attacks Athanasius, 304.

Nectaria, deaconess, 321.

Nectarius, bishop of Constantinople, 364; election of, 204, 380; abolished office of commissioner of penance, 386; death, 399.

Neonas, bishop of Seleucia, deposed by Acacians, 321.

Nestabius, a martyr of Gaza, 332.

Nestor the Confessor, death of, 332.

Nestorianism, 201, 223.

Nestorius, bishop of Constantinople, 223.

Nicæa, in Bithynia, 205; council convened, 253.

Nicarete, a lady of Bithynia, 199; noble character of, 414.

Nicene creed, 207; adhered to by the West, 291.

Nicenism, geographical distribution of, 217, 291, 359; adherents take courage, 375.

Nicomedia, earthquake of, 205, 310.

Nicopolis, 343.

Nilammon, a monk of Gera, refuses bishopric, 411; death, 411.

Nitria, monastic life at, 369.

Nonnichia, wife of Gerontius, 426.

Novatians, church of, in Constantinople, 198; destroyed, 315; opposed by Sozomen, 206; refused restoration to excommunicated, 208, 256; separated from the church, 280; cause of their immunity from suppression, 281; church of, in Cyzicus demolished, 316; persecution by Macedonius, 316; observance of the Passover, 361; schismatic action, 361; Easter and Sabbatian disputes, 388; prosperity under Arcadius and Honorius, 398.

Novatius, doctrine of, 256, 361.

 

Olympias, a widow, 404; ordained deaconess by Nectarius, 405; rebuked by Chrysostom for unwise giving, 405; being persecuted, refuses to hold communion with Arsacius, and goes to Cyzicus, 415.

Origen, controversy, 206, 406-408; works of, 368; assailed by Theophilus and other bishops, 408.

Origen, a monk of Scetis, 368.

Origenists, definition of, 407.

Otreinus, bishop of Melitine, 382.

Otreus, bishop of Melitene, 353.

 

Pachomius, a Melitian bishop, 275.

Pachomius, a monk, sees an angel, 202.

Pachon, an ascetic of Scetis, 367.

Pagan worship interdicted, 244.

Palestine, the church in, 211.

Palladius, the historian, a source used by Sozomen, 223.

Pambo, Egyptian ascetic, 291, 358.

Pan, statue of, destroyed, 262.

Papas, Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Paphnutius, the confessor, 246, 291; argues against enforced celibacy, 256.

Paschal, usages of Montanists, 206; controversy, 252; Hosius sent to settle it, 253; controversy decided at Nicæa, 286; how observed by Novatians, 361; Novatian and Sabbatian position, 389; usage of Pepuzites, 389.

Patrines, a Melitian presbyter, 273.

Patrophilus, bishop of Scythopolis, sides with Arius against Alexander, 252, but accepts decision of Nicene council, 255; charged by Eustathius with Arianism, 270; attends second council of Antioch, 280; deposed, 318.

Paul, bishop of Constantinople, 199; succeeds Alexander, 284; expelled, 284, 287; goes to Rome, 287; reinstated, 288; again ejected, 288; affirms Nicene doctrine, 291; again returns, 300; once more ejected and banished, dies in exile, 301; burial, 382.

Paul of Ferme, a monk, 367.

Paul of Jugatum, a Persian monk, 371.

Paul the Simple, disciple of Antony the Great, becomes an ascetic, 250.

Paulianians, a heretical sect, 280.

Paulinists, 358.

Paulinus, bishop of Antioch, divides see with Meletius, 378; death, 385.

Paulinus, bishop of Treves, defends Athanasius, 305.

Paulinus, bishop of Tyre, sides with Arius against Alexander, 252; charged by Eustathius with Arianism, 270.

Paulus, Persian bishop and martyr, 267.

Pelagius, bishop of Laodicea, 353, 382.

Penance, 338, 399; peculiar to the West, 386.

Persia, church of, 211; how established, 264; persecution under Sapor, 265; sixteen thousand names of martyrs known, 267.

Peter, Apocalypse of, 196.

Peter, appointed bishop of Alexandria by Athanasius, expels Arius, suffers martyrdom, 251, 257; deposed by Valens, 357; condemns Apolinarianism, 362; returns, 375.

Philip, prefect of Constantinople, 288.

Philippus of Side, a source of Sozomen's history, 223.

Philo Judæus, description of monks, 248.

Philostorgius, 209; a source of Sozomen's history, 222.

Photinus, bishop of Sirmium, heresy of, 302; is deposed, 303; followers not tolerated by Gratian, 377.

Photius, gives Sozomen's name, 233.

Phritigernes, a Gothic leader, 373.

Phrygians, a heretical sect, 280.

Phuscon, a monk of Bethelia in Palestine, 191, 233, 370.

Piammon, presbyter and monk, sees an angel, 202, 366.

Pior, an Egyptian monk, 367.

Piturion, 291.

Placetus, bishop of Antioch, succeeded Euphronius, 285, 298.

Plagiarism of Sozomen, from Socrates, 221.

Plato, 274.

Plinthus, reconciles Arian factions, 388.

Plusian, a bishop, 275.

Polemics, deleterious, 207.

Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, 390.

Polychronius, a presbyter, aids Pulcheria in discovery of tomb of Forty Martyrs, 420.

Pontus, 356.

Porphyry, succeeds Flavian as bishop of Antioch, 415; persecutes Johannists, 415.

Prapidius, a rural bishop, 371.

Primacy of Rome, 209.

Prisciallianists, 206.

Private judgment, 206.

Proærssius, a sophist of Athens, 356.

Probatius, eunuch under Jovian, 349.

Probianus, a physician, miraculously cured, and becomes a Christian, 260.

Proclus, bishop of Constantinople, 201, 224.

Procopius, revolts against Valens, defeated, 351.

Protogenes, bishop of Sardica, deposed by Eastern bishops, 290; expands Nicene creed, 290.

Protogenes, a Syrian monk, 370; succeeded Vitus as bishop of Carræ, 370.

Psathyrians, an Arian sect, 388.

Pulcheria, sister of Theodosus the Younger, 196, 204; marries Marcian, 200; previous vow of virginity, 201; opposed Eutychianism, 201; is protector of the emperor, 205, 419; opposed free thought, 206, 223; inclined to asceticism, 212; excellent character, 224, 419, 421; discovers tomb of the Forty Martyrs, 421.

Purification, of Hercules and Greeks, after crime, 243.

Pusices, a Persian martyr, 266.

Putubastus, 291; "Putubatus," 368.

 

Quadragesima, 412.

Quartodecimarians, 206, 389.

Quintianus, ordained bishop of Gaza, 287; repudiated by Western bishops, 290.

 

Relic worship, 208.

Rhinocorura, monastic life at, 369.

Rhodanus [or Rhodanius], bishop of Toulouse, 305.

Romanus, bishop of Antioch, 241.

Rome, sack of, under Alaric, 424; incidents during the sack, 425.

Rufinus, the historian, one of Sozomen's sources, 222.

 

Sabbatians, origin and doctrines, 388; difficulties of their theory, 389.

Sabbatius, Arian presbyter, originates Sabbatian heresy, 388.

Sabellian heresy, 335.

Sabellius, 270.

Sabinus, the historian, a source of Sozomen's history, 223.

Sacraments, as mysteries, 207.

St. Euphemia, church of, in Chalcedon, 199.

St. Michael, Archangel, church of, at Hestiæ, 196, 198.

St. Stephen, church of, at Constantinople, 199; erected by Novatians, 414.

St. Thyrsus, 196; church of, 199, 420.

Salamines [also Salamanus], a monk of Bethelia, in Palestine, 191; 370; brother to Fuscon and Crispian, 233, 408.

Sallust, the historian, 206.

Sallust, prætorian prefect, 342.

Sapor, king of Persia, persecutes the Christians, 264; subsequently applies order only to the leaders, 266; sends embassy to Constantine, 268.

Saracens, 374; derived from Ishmael, 375; customs, 375; converted to Christianity, 375.

Sarmates, presbyter of Alexandria, becomes an Arian, 251.

Sarmatians, revolt against Valentinian, but submit, 372.

Schism of Sardica, 289; Eastern bishops depose Julius, 289, and Hosius, also Maximus of Treves, and Protogenes, and Gaudentius of Sardica, 290; Western bishops depose Theodore, Narcissus, etc., 290; adhere to Nicene faith, 291.

Sciri, slaves in Asia Minor, 197, 201, 422.

Scitis, a town of Egypt, 250.

Scriptures, the, interpreted by the Θεωρία, 205.

Scythians, attacked by Valens, 375; assail Constantinople, 377.

Scythopolis, refuge of Egyptian monks, 198, 407.

Secundus, bishop of Ptolemais, accepts decree of Nicene council, 255.

Secundus, prætorian prefect, 348.

Selinus, a bishop of the Goths, becomes a Psathyrian, 388.

Sepulchre discovered, 258.

Serapion, bishop of Thumis, 213, 294; defends Athanasius, 305.

Serapion, an Egyptian monk, 365; archdeacon of Chrysostom, 404; unruly in temper, causes trouble to Chrysostom, 404, 405; made bishop of Heraclea, 412.

Serapion, a temple of Alexandria, 385; converted into a church, 386.

Severianus, 213; bishop of Gabali, 405; offends Chrysostom, 405; acts with the latter's opponents, 409; arouses resentment of Constantinopolitans, 410; flees, 411.

Sibyl, predicted Christ's coming, 239.

Sigesarius, bishop of the Goths, 424.

Silvanus, bishop of Tarsus, deposed by Acacians, 321; opposes Nicene doctrines, 348; but afterward accepts them, 352.

Silvester, bishop of Rome, 241; succeeded by Mark, 271.

Simeon, Syrian monk, 293.

Siricius, succeeds Damasus as bishop of Rome, 398; death, 415.

Sisinius, deputy of Agelius, 382; afterward bishop of Novatians at Constantinople, 382, 398; personal character, 398; dream of, concerning Eutropius the reader, 414.

Socrates, the historian, 207; relation of his work to that of Sozomen, 221.

Solon, bishop of Rhinocorura, 369.

Sopater, 242.

Sophia, church of, founded by Constantine, 198, 322; dedicated by Constantius, 198.

Sophronius, bishop of Pompeiopolis, deposed by Acacius, 321; accepts Macedonian doctrines, 336; opposes Nicene doctrines, 348.

Sotadus, 255.

Sozomen, Salaminius Hermas, life, 191-199; origin and order of the name, 191, 233; born near Bethelia, 191, 233, 337; not a Jew, 192; grandfather a Christian, 192, 233; converted by Hilarion, 233, 337; S. born, 370-380; educated at Gaza, 234; by monks, 193, 233; hence his high estimate of monastic life, 193, 233; not a monk, 193; knew Greek and Syriac, and used Syrian records of Persian church, 193; probably also knew Latin, 194; general scholarship narrow, 194-195; religious affiliations Nicene, but not critical, 195; studied law at Berytus, 234, 235; became a civil and ecclesiastical lawyer, 196, 233; at Constantinople, c. a.d. 406, 196; careful in statement of ecclesiastical legislation, 196; illiberal in policy toward the Persians, Arians, and Pagans, 197; pietistic, 197; defended Chrysostom, 197; knowledge of Palestine, 197; of Arabia, Cyprus, Alexandria, Antioch, and Edessa, 197; and of Constantinople, 199; S. as author, 199-225; his epitome lost, 200, 234; his history, written between a.d. 443 and 448, 201, 202; its objects, 201-213; (1) to present facts, 201; (2) to prove (a) divine origin of Christianity, 202; (3) (b) Providence promoting Christianity, 203; his efforts to this end absurd, 203; and biased, 204; (4) to prove Catholic orthodoxy, 205; hence apologizes for Constantine, 209; (5) to trace extension of Christianity, 211; (6) to dignify monasticism, 212; (7) to give secular history; (8) to develop historically legislation favorable to church, 213; his method, 213-217; (1) acknowledges limitations, (2) research (a) personal knowledge, (b) personal inquiry, (c) knowledge at secondhand, 213; (d) correction of falsehoods, (e) use of πυνθάνομαι, (f) and ἀκριβόω, (g) and documents, 214; (3) textual, and (4) analytical criticism lacking, (5) interprets events by (a) criticism of facts, 214, (b) using history ethically, (c) suggesting motives, (d) apologizing for favorites, (e) yielding to personal feeling, (f) pragmatic deduction, (g) centralizing prominent figures, (h) dwelling on human nature, (i) explaining away faults of the orthodox, and (j) speculating, 215; (6) chronological method, (a) imperial reigns his epochs, and (b) uses consulates as reference dates, 215; (7) geographical contributions, 215; names mostly Hebrew or Syrian, 215; (8) statistics unmethodical, (9) biography abundant, and fair, (10) ecclesiastical culture indirectly treated; (11) no systematic treatment of dogmatics and ethics, 216; (12) his knowledge of Christian literature incomplete, (13) treatment unphilosophical, (14) general style good and summaries excellent, 217. The period covered, presumptively a.d. 323-439, 217; but really only to a.d. 437, viz. Constantine to Theodosius II., 218; grouping of books by twos, 218. For whom he wrote; not merely for monks, nor for the learned, but for Christians generally, 218. His sources, I., those mentioned by S., 218-220; II., those unmentioned, 221-223; main authorities not indicated, 221; (1) relations to Socrates' history: three views, (a) Sozomen plagiarized (untenable), 221; (probable), 234; (b) both used same authorities independently (untenable), (c) Sozomen followed Socrates' lead to authorities (probable), 221, 222; (2) Rufinus, (3) Eusebius' Life of Constantine, (4) Athanasius, (5) Philostorgius, 222; (6) Sabinus, (7) Philippus of Side, (8) codices Gregorianus, Hermogianus, and Theodosianus, (9) Basil, (10) Gregory Nazianzen, (11) Sulpicius Severus, (12) Palladius, 223; stated by himself, 240. The ninth book, change in method, deals with the West, 223; unfinished, (a) intention not carried out, (b) Nestorianism not delineated, (c) events anticipated, narration uncompleted, 223; (d) ecclesiastical matters barely touched, (e) Stephen's story promised, but not given, (f, g) close abrupt, 224; conclusion not lost, abrupt close due to author's death, 224. By whom used, (a) Epiphanius Scholasticus, (b) Liberatus, (c) Theophanes, (d) Theodorus Lector, Nicephorus Callistus, 224, 225; errors numerous, 225.

Spyridon, bishop of Trimythum, story of, 246; rebukes Triphyllius, 247.

Stephen, ascetic of Mareotis, 367.

Stephen, bishop of Antioch, deposed, 298.

Stephen the Martyr, relics discovered, 224.

Stilicho, general under Honorius, plots against the empire, 421; slain by soldiers, 421.

Sulpicius Severus, a source of Sozomen's history, 223.

Symeon, archbishop of Seleucia and Ctesiphon, arrested by Sapor, 264; is beheaded, 265.

Synod, see Council.

 

Tabenna, island of Egypt, home of the Tabennesian monks, 292.

Tabennesian monks, origin and mode of life, 291.

Tarbula, sister of Symeon, martyrdom of, 266.

Tatian, a Phrygian martyr, 334.

Terentius, bishop of Tomi, 382.

Textual criticism of Sozomen, 227.

Themistius, philosopher, 211, 372.

Theoctistus, gives name to the Psathyrians, 388.

Theodore, bishop of Heraclea, 284; attends second council of Antioch, 285; goes to Rome, 289; repudiated by bishops of the West, 290; attacks Athanasius, 304.

Theodore, bishop of Mopsuestia, 399; schoolfellow of Chrysostom, 399.

Theodore the Confessor, of Antioch, 342.

Theodore, disciple of Ammon, in Egypt, 250.

Theodore, military officer, executed at order of Valens, 372.

Theodoritus, presbyter of Antioch, 331.

Theodosiolus, a relative of the Emperor Honorius, 425.

Theodosius the Great, 324, 332; built temple over head of John Baptist, 199, 391; character according to Sozomen, 200; literary eulogium on, 200; self-controlled and peaceful, 200; sees apparition of Martyr Basiliscus, 202; suppresses heresy and paganism, 209; address to, 236-238; associated with Gratian, 377; baptized, 378; gives title "Catholic Church" to the orthodox, 378; orders Demophilus to renounce Arianism, 379; attempts unification of church, 382; opposes Maximus and avenges Gratian, 384; orders pagan temples of Alexandria demolished, 285; excludes women under sixty years of age from ministry, 387; banishes Eunomius, 387; consults John of Thebais, 392; exacts tribute of Antioch in Syria, 392; declares Honorius emperor, defeats Eugenius, 393; reproached by Ambrose--the cause, 394; death, 397.

Theodosius the Younger, 205; succeeds Arcadius, 419.

Theodotus, Arian bishop of Laodicea, 362; ejects, but reinstates, Apolinarius, father and son, 362.

Theodulus, a Phrygian martyr, 334.

Theognis, bishop of province of Bithynia, favors Arianism, 293.

Theognis, bishop of Nicæa, repudiates Arian doctrines, 255; deposed, 255; regains bishopric, 268.

Theonas, an Egyptian ascetic, 365.

Theophanes, mentions Stephen, 224.

Theophilus, bishop of Alexandria, 212, 385, 398; opposes ordination of Chrysostom at Constantinople, 400; instance of sharp dealing, 400; unites with Chrysostom to unite churches of East and West, 400; maintains incorporeality of God, 406; but by sophistry deceives the people, 406; becomes hostile to "Long Brothers" and to Isidore, 406; complains of them and the eighty monks to Chrysostom, 407; returns no answer to latter's letter, 407; by double dealing enlists Epiphanius on his side, attempts to oust Chrysostom, 407; writes against books of Origen, 408; goes to Chalcedon in crusade against Chrysostom, 409; secures dethronement of Chrysostom at Ruffinianæ, 409; after a cold reception at Constantinople, 409; causes strife at Constantinople, 411; flees, and visits Gera, where he attempts to ordain a bishop, 411.

Theophilus, bishop of Eleutheropolis and of Castabala, 321; accepts Nicene doctrines, 352.

Theophilus of Ohn, 211.

Theophronius, author of Eunomianism, 363, 387.

Theotimus, bishop of Tomi, performs a miracle, 395; opposes Epiphanius in attack on Chrysostom, 408.

Theotokos, Nestorian view of, opposed by Sozomen, 206.

Thyrsus the Martyr, aids Pulcheria to discover tomb of the Forty Martyrs, 420.

Tigrius, presbyter of Constantinople, persecuted by opponents of Chrysostom, 415.

Timothy, presbyter of Alexandria, 275; bishop, 366; biographer of monastics, 366; death, 385.

Titus, bishop of Bostra, 294, 337.

Tomi, capital of Scythia, 359.

Translations of Sozomen, 227, 228.

Trinity, 335, 378, 398.

True cross, found on Calvary, cures sick, restores dead to life, 259.

Tryphillius, bishop of Berytus, 196; rebuked by Spyridon, 247.

 

Uldis, overthrow of, 197, 201, 422.

Ulfilas (or Ulphilas), bishop of the Goths, 319; becomes an Arian for state reasons, 373.

Ulphilas, a general of Honorius, 426.

Uranius, bishop of Tyre, deposed, 318.

Ursacius, bishop of Sigidunus, deposed by Western bishops, 290; Arian tendencies of, 291; acknowledges falsity of charges against Athanasius, 300; attempts to force Aetianism on council of Ariminum, 312; but fails, 313.

Ursacius, schismatic bishop of Rome, 359.

Uzthazanes, a eunuch, suffers martyrdom, 265.

 

Valens, Emperor, portents during reign, 205, 209; compared with Valentinian, 217, 349; proclaimed Emperor by brother, 350; Arian in doctrine, 350; adopts Eudoxian views, 351; defeats Procopius, 351; persecutes Nicene adherents and Novatians, 351, 352; and Macedonians, 352; prohibits council at Tarsus, 353; orders orthodox bishops ejected, 353; permits return of Athanasius, 354; massacres deputation of orthodox Christians, 355; purposes further injury of the orthodox, 355; persecutes the orthodox of Syrian Antioch, 356; banishes and recalls Vetranio, 359; incensed at use of divination to learn his successor's name, 371; hears oration of Themistius, 372; becomes more humane, 373; angered by Constantinopolitans, makes war on the Scythians, 375; death predicted by monk Isaac, 376; death, 376.

Valens, bishop of Mursia, deposed by bishops of the West, 290; Arian tendencies, 291; acknowledges falsity of accusations against Athanasius, 300; favors Aetian heresy, 312; but fails to force it on council of Ariminum, 313; gains Constantius, 314; persecutes Nicene adherents, 315; calls his formulary the Nicene, 315.

Valentian, two Syrian monks, 371.

Valentinian I., emperor, 217, 349; proclaimed emperor, 349; banishment under Julian, 350; proclaims Gratian emperor, 352; supports Nicene doctrines, 359; dies in a fit of rage, 372.

Valentinian II., proclaimed Emperor of the West, 372; flees from Italy on approach of Maximus, 384; death, 392.

Valentinian III., succeeds Honorius, 427.

Valentinians, 206; a separate sect, 280.

Valesius, prefatory remarks, 233, 234.

Venus, temple of, at Aphaca destroyed, 262.

Verinian, a relative of the Emperor Honorius, 425.

Vetranio, bishop of the Scythians, 359; banished and recalled by Valens, 359.

Vetranius, conspires against Constantius, 301; is betrayed and retires, 302.

Vicentius, presbyter of Rome, attends Nicene council, 253.

Victor, bishop of Rome, paschal controversy with Polycarp of Smyrna, 390.

Vincent, a presbyter, guardian of relics of John Baptist, 391; renounces Macedonian tenets, 391.

Virgin Mary, perpetual virginity of, 239.

Vitalius, presbyter of Antioch, 362; became Apolinarian bishop of Antioch, 362.

Vito, presbyter of Rome, attends Nicene council, 253.

Vitus, bishop of Carræ, 370.

 

Western Christians, 241.

Western church, and schism of Sardica, 290, 291; adheres to Nicene doctrines, 360.

Word, see Logos.

 

Zachariah (Zechariah), the prophet, finding of body of, 198, 224, 427; prophecy of "the bit of the horse," 259.

Zacharias (or Zechariah), president of a monastery at Gerari, 370, 427.

Zeno, bishop of Majuma, 195; murder of, 209, 332.

Zeno, bishop of Tyre, 353.

Zeno, cousin of above, 332.

Zeno, monk of Majuma, afterwards bishop of Botolium, 396.

Zeno, a monk of Nisibis, 370.

Zocomus, a monk of Majuma, afterwards bishop of Botolium, 396.

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