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96. Psalm 96

1Oh sing unto Jehovah a new song:

Sing unto Jehovah, all the earth.

2Sing unto Jehovah, bless his name;

Show forth his salvation from day to day.

3Declare his glory among the nations,

His marvellous works among all the peoples.

4For great is Jehovah, and greatly to be praised:

He is to be feared above all gods.

5For all the gods of the peoples are aidols;

But Jehovah made the heavens.

6Honor and majesty are before him:

Strength and beauty are in his sanctuary.

7Ascribe unto Jehovah, ye kindreds of the peoples,

Ascribe unto Jehovah glory and strength.

8Ascribe unto Jehovah the glory due unto his name:

Bring an offering, and come into his courts.

9Oh worship Jehovah ain holy array:

Tremble before him, all the earth.

10Say among the nations, Jehovah reigneth:

The world also is established that it cannot be moved:

He will judge the peoples with equity.

11Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice;

Let the sea roar, and the fulness thereof;

12Let the field exult, and all that is therein;

Then shall all the trees of the wood sing for joy

13Before Jehovah; for he cometh,

For he cometh to judge the earth:

He will judge the world with righteousness,

And the peoples awith his truth.

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9 Worship before Jehovah The Psalmist prosecutes the same train of sentiment. In requiring oblations of his people, God was not to be considered as standing in need of the services of the creature, but as giving them an opportunity of professing their faith. The true reason, therefore, is here mentioned why the oblation was enjoined, That his people might prostrate themselves before him, and acknowledge that they and all belonging to them were his. Mention is made of the beauty of the temple, referring to the fact that the Gentiles should be raised to a new honor, in being associated into one body with God’s chosen people. 8888     “Pour monstrer que les Gentils devoyent estre receus a un honneur nouveau, qu’ils feront un mesme corps avec le peuple eleu.” — Fr. At the time when this psalm was written, it was generally deemed scarcely credible that the heathen nations would be admitted into the temple in company with the holy seed of Abraham. This should make us think all the more highly of our calling as Gentiles, which seemed then so incredible and impracticable a thing. We may be convinced that God only could have opened for us the door of salvation. The beauty of the temple is an expression intended to beget a reverential view of the temple, that men may approach it with humble fear, instead of rushing without consideration into God’s presence. The clause which follows in the verse is inserted for the same purpose — tremble before his face, intimating that we should prostrate ourselves as suppliants before him when we consider his awful majesty. Not that he would deter worshippers from drawing near to God. They should esteem it their greatest pleasure and enjoyment to seek his face. But he would have us humbled to the right and serious worship of God. I may add, that the beauty or glory of the sanctuary did not consist in silver and gold, in the preciousness of the material of which it was made, nor in polished stones, nor in any splendor and decoration of this kind, but in the representation of the heavenly pattern which was shown to Moses on the mount, (Exodus 25:9.)




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