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48. Psalm 48

1Great is Jehovah, and greatly to be praised,

In the city of our God, in his holy mountain.

2Beautiful in elevation, the joy of the whole earth,

Is mount Zion, on the sides of the north,

The city of the great King.

3God hath made himself known in her palaces for a refuge.

4For, lo, the kings assembled themselves,

They passed by together.

5They saw it, then were they amazed;

They were dismayed, they hasted away.

6Trembling took hold of them there,

Pain, as of a woman in travail.

7With the east wind

Thou breakest the ships of Tarshish.

8As we have heard, so have we seen

In the city of Jehovah of hosts, in the city of our God:

God will establish it for ever.

Selah

9We have thought on thy lovingkindness, O God,

In the midst of thy temple.

10As is thy name, O God,

So is thy praise unto the ends of the earth:

Thy right hand is full of righteousness.

11Let mount Zion be glad,

Let the daughters of Judah rejoice,

Because of thy judgments.

12Walk about Zion, and go round about her;

Number the towers thereof;

13Mark ye well her bulwarks;

Consider her palaces:

That ye may tell it to the generation following.

14For this God is our God for ever and ever:

He will be our guide even unto death.

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9 O God! we have waited for thy mercy This verse teaches us that the faithful were preserved by the power of God; for, when all things were in a state of the greatest confusion, they continued tranquil and patient until God at length, having pity upon them, brought them help. The Hebrew word, דמם, damam, which we have rendered to wait, properly signifies to be silent, and is here used to denote tranquillity of mind. From this we conclude, that the people of God were so harassed with dangers, that, had they listened to the judgment of carnal sense and reason, they would have been overwhelmed with terror; even as we know that men are in a state of continual uneasiness, and are driven hither and thither by contrary waves, until faith tranquillise their minds, and settle them in true patience. The amount of what the Psalmist says is, that the faithful, although severely afflicted, were not driven from their purpose, and prevented from relying upon the aid of God; but that, on the contrary, by their patience and hope, they opened the gate of his grace. It served to magnify and illustrate the greatness of the grace of God, that their expectations of assistance from him were not disappointed. From this we may also deduce the profitable warning, that if the aid of God is withdrawn from us, it is because we distrust his promises, and, by our impatience, prevent his grace, which is laid up for those who wait in patience, from flowing upon us. But what is meant by the expression, In the midst of the temple? Is it that the people of God maintained their faith only in that place, and that each of them ceased to hope as soon as he returned to his own dwelling? No; on the contrary, it is certain that they carried home with them the hope which they had entertained in the temple, that they might continue steadfastly to abide by it. But God having promised that this place, in which he would be called upon, would be the seat and dwelling-place of his power and grace, his people here affirm, that, relying upon this heavenly promise, they were persuaded beyond all doubt that God would show himself merciful and gracious towards them, since they had a real and sure pledge of his presence. We must not conceive, merely because our own fancy suggests it, that God will be our deliverer. We are to believe that he will be so only in so far as he freely and willingly offers himself to us in this character. Now, if this symbol or pledge of the presence of God, which was only a shadow, ought to have had such influence upon the minds of true believers under the former dispensation, as to make them hope for life in the midst of death, surely when Christ has now descended amongst us, to unite us much more closely to his Father, we have sufficient ground for continuing in a state of undisturbed tranquillity, although the world should be embroiled in confusion and turned upside down. Only it must be our endeavor that the service of God may flourish pure and entire amongst us, and that thus the glory of his temple may shine forth in the midst of us.




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