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25. Psalm 25

1Unto thee, O Jehovah, do I lift up my soul.

2O my God, in thee have I trusted,

Let me not be put to shame;

Let not mine enemies triumph over me.

3Yea, none that wait for thee shall be put to shame:

They shall be put to shame that deal treacherously without cause.

4Show me thy ways, O Jehovah;

Teach me thy paths.

5Guide me in thy truth, and teach me;

For thou art the God of my salvation;

For thee do I wait all the day.

6Remember, O Jehovah, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindness;

For they have been ever of old.

7Remember not the sins of my youth, nor my transgressions:

According to thy lovingkindness remember thou me,

For thy goodness' sake, O Jehovah.

8Good and upright is Jehovah:

Therefore will he instruct sinners in the way.

9The meek will he guide in justice;

And the meek will he teach his way.

10All the paths of Jehovah are lovingkindness and truth

Unto such as keep his covenant and his testimonies.

11For thy name's sake, O Jehovah,

Pardon mine iniquity, for it is great.

12What man is he that feareth Jehovah?

Him shall he instruct in the way that he shall choose.

13His soul shall dwell at ease;

And his seed shall inherit the land.

14The friendship of Jehovah is with them that fear him;

And he will show them his covenant.

15Mine eyes are ever toward Jehovah;

For he will pluck my feet out of the net.

16Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me;

For I am desolate and afflicted.

17The troubles of my heart are enlarged:

Oh bring thou me out of my distresses.

18Consider mine affliction and my travail;

And forgive all my sins.

19Consider mine enemies, for they are many;

And they hate me with cruel hatred.

20Oh keep my soul, and deliver me:

Let me not be put to shame, for I take refuge in thee.

21Let integrity and uprightness preserve me,

For I wait for thee.

22Redeem Israel, O God,

Out all of his troubles.

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7. Remember not the sins of my youth. As our sins are like a wall between us and God, which prevents him from hearing our prayers, or stretching forth his hand to help us, David now removes this obstruction. It is indeed true, in general, that men pray in a wrong way, and in vain, unless they begin by seeking the forgiveness of their sins. There is no hope of obtaining any favor from God unless he is reconciled to us. How shall he love us unless he first freely reconcile us to himself? The right and proper order of prayer therefore is, as I have said, to ask, at the very outset, that God would pardon our sins. David here acknowledges, in explicit terms, that he cannot in any other way become a partaker of the grace of God than by having his sins blotted out. In order, therefore, that God may be mindful of his mercy towards us, it is necessary that he forget our sins, the very sight of which turns away his favor from us. In the meantime, the Psalmist confirms by this more clearly what I have already said, that although the wicked acted towards him with cruelty, and persecuted him unjustly, yet he ascribed to his own sins all the misery which he endured. For why should he ask the forgiveness of his sins, by having recourse to the mercy of God, but because he acknowledged, that by the cruel treatment he received from his enemies, he only suffered the punishment which he justly merited? He has, therefore, acted wisely in turning his thoughts to the first cause of his misery, that he may find out the true remedy; and thus he teaches us by his example, that when any outward affliction presses upon us, we must entreat God not only to deliver us from it, but also to blot out our sins, by which we have provoked his displeasure, and subjected ourselves to his chastening rod. If we act otherwise, we shall follow the example of unskilful physicians, who, overlooking the cause of the disease, only seek to alleviate the pain, and apply merely adventitious remedies for the cure. Moreover, David makes confession not only of some slight offenses, as hypocrites are wont to do, who, by confessing their guilt in a general and perfunctory manner, either seek some subterfuge, or else extenuate the enormity of their sin; but he traces back his sins even to his very childhood, and considers in how many ways he had provoked the wrath of God against him. When he makes mention of the sins which he had committed in his youth, he does not mean by this that he had no remembrance of any of the sins which he had committed in his later years; but it is rather to show that he considered himself worthy of so much the greater condemnation. 556556     “Redevable de tant plus grande condemnation.” — Fr. In the first place, considering that he had not begun only of late to commit sin, but that he had for a long time heaped up sin upon sin, he bows himself, if we may so speak, under the accumulated load; and, in the second place, he intimates, that if God should deal with him according to the rigour of law, not only the sins of yesterday, or of a few days, would come into judgment against him, but all the instances in which he had offended, even from his infancy, might now with justice be laid to his charge. As often, therefore, as God terrifies us by his judgments and the tokens of his wrath, let us call to our remembrance, not only the sins which we have lately committed, but also all the transgressions of our past life, proving to us the ground of renewed shame and renewed lamentation. Besides, in order to express more fully that he supplicates a free pardon, he pleads before God only on the ground of his mere good pleasure; and therefore he says, According to thy compassion do thou remember me When God casts our sins into oblivion, this leads him to behold us with fatherly regard. David can discover no other cause by which to account for this paternal regard of God, but that he is good, and hence it follows that there is nothing to induce God to receive us into his favor but his own good pleasure. When God is said to remember us according to his mercy, we are tacitly given to understand that there are two ways of remembering which are entirely opposite; the one when he visits sinners in his wrath, and the other when he again manifests his favor to those of whom he seemed for a time to take no account.




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