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HAMPTON COURT CONFERENCE:

A meeting called by James I. of England at Hampton Court Palace (15 m. w.s.w. of London) in 1604 for the discussion of differences between the Puritans and the High-church party. It was occasioned by certain petitions from the Puritans, particularly the "Millenary Petition", which was presented to James while he was on the way to London in Apr., 1603. The conference met on Jan. 14, 16, and 18. James, who presided, was supported by Archbishop Whitgift, eight bishops, seven deans, and two other clergy. The petitioners were represented by four Puritans of moderate views, John Reynolds, president of Corpus Christi College, Oxford; Laurence Chaderton, master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge; Thomas Sparks and John Knewstubs,--all of James's own selection. After the king had spent the first day in the discussion of various topics with his supporters, the four Puritan representatives were admitted to the second day's conference, and Reynolds, as spokesman, was allowed to present their grievances. He brought forward four headings: (1) purity of doctrine; (2) the ministry; (3) the reform of church government, and (4) the amendment of the Book of Common Prayer. He asked the incorporation of the nine Lambeth Articles with the Thirty-Nine Articles, demanded an enlargement of the catechism and a new translation of the Bible, presented the objections of the Puritans to the Book of Common Prayer, and insisted on the need of a preaching ministry. When he came to speak of disciplinary questions an unfortunate use of the word "presbytery" threw James into such a rage that he broke up the conference for the day. On the third day of the conference James met his clergy, with whom were now associated the leading ecclesiastical lawyers, and later called in the Puritan representatives to hear his decision. The old ceremonies were to continue; there was to be no provision for a preaching ministry; and the existing church order was to be upheld. The following changes--very unsatisfactory to the Puritans--were made in the Prayer-book: mention of baptizing of infants by women was omitted; in the rubric of absolution was inserted "remission of sins"; confirmation was termed "laying on of hands"; all the thanksgivings, except the general one, were inserted; to the catechism was annexed the whole of the latter portion relative to the two sacraments; and some words were altered in the lessons. Reynolds' request for anew translation of the Bible bore fruit in the so-called Authorized Version, by far the most important result of the conference. See PURITANS, PURITANISM, 15.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: T. Fuller, Church Hist. of Britain, book x., section i., London, 1837; W. Clark, The Anglican Reformation, pp. 364 sqq., New York, 1897; J. H. Overton, The Church in England, ii. 4 sqq., ib. 1897; W. H. Frere, The English Church (1558-1625), pp. 196 sqq., ib. 1904; F. Procter and W. H. Frere, A New Hist. of the Book of Common Prayer, pp. 137-140 et passim, ib. 1305.

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