LITTLE FLOWERS OF SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI, Chapter 39

willbulow's picture

OF THE WONDERFUL DISCOURSE WHICH ST ANTHONY OF PADUA A FRIAR MINOR, MADE IN THE CONSISTORY

All present "understood what he said as perfectly as if he had spoken the language of each." In my travels I've visited churches where I've heard sermons preached in languages I didn't understand, or didn't understand really well enough to get more than the gist of the message. There's something wonderful about participating in worship in a language we don't understand. I think it has to do with knowing that we're about something that goes beyond our ethnic boundaries, and that is inexpicable, anyway. Not comprehending the words, I often found myself resonating the emotions of the preacher. I usually had some clue about the message, such as knowing what scriptural text it was based on, and that helped me understand enough to appreciate the message on a spiritual or emotional level. Here in America, we can usually find a Spanish speaking church to visit. In most major cities, there are usually ethnic churches. Maybe next time you're travelling and looking for a place to worship, you might seek this kind of worship experience. It calls to mind the mention of the gathering of people from every language and tribe in Revelation.

jnwarren's picture

The closest thing I've seen

The closest thing I've seen to Glossaliola is television, but we won't get into that.

As to this: "We have others in our day that scoff at the miraculous, and offer any materialistic excuse to lay it conveniently aside. We ignore them when we can, and suffer the cross when we can’t. As such, they can be a catalyst to the intimate approach of Our Lord",

I find this quite insulting. But again, as said warrior7, how can you show the light to those who are blind, or likewise, speak to those who won't listen, and whop put up ideological barriers which it is offensive to cross. If someone told me it was below them to speak to a black person, I would hardly have an appropriate response; neither do I now.

This is an essay that refutes "change through internal contradiction", which I would argue would be required for a "miracle" to occur, ie., a chair becoming a table or water becoming wine, etc, which, needless to say, contradicts the law of identity (ie., A=A). We can discuss this more if you like.

I suppose people will always continue to hide behind artifice, even as the means to do so becomes more and more difficult. You ask me why I bother with "mysticism", and I begin to ask myself the same thing.

" alterius non sit qui suus esse potest "




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