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George Whitefield

Methodist evangelist

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Summary

George Whitefield (December 27  1714 – September 30, 1770), also known as George Whitfield, was an English Anglican priest who helped spread the Great Awakening in Britain, and especially in the British North American colonies. He was one of the founders of Methodism and of the evangelical movement generally.

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Died
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December 16, 1714,
Gloucester
September 29, 1770,
Newburyport, Massachusetts
Biography, Early works, Great Awakening, Great Britain, History
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Biography

 George Whitefield
Source: Wikipedia

George Whitefield was born on December 16, 1714, in Gloucester, England. The youngest of seven children, he was born in the Bell Inn where his father, Thomas, was a wine merchant and innkeeper. His father died when George was two and his widowed mother Elizabeth struggled to provide for her family. Because he thought he would never make much use of his education, at about age 15 George persuaded his mother to let him leave school and work in the inn. However, sitting up late at night, George became a diligent student of the Bible. A visit to his Mother by an Oxford student who worked his way through college encouraged George to pursue a university education. He returned to grammar school to finish his preparation to enter Oxford, losing only about one year of school.

In 1732 at age 17, George entered Pembroke College at Oxford. He was gradually drawn into a group called the "Holy Club" where he met John and Charles Wesley. Charles Wesley loaned him the book, The Life of God in the Soul of Man. The reading of this book, after a long and painful struggle which even affected him physically, finally resulted in George's conversion in 1735. He said many years later: "I know the place.... Whenever I go to Oxford, I cannot help running to the spot where Jesus Christ first revealed himself to me and gave me the new birth."

Forced to leave school because of poor health, George returned home for nine months of recuperation. Far from idle, his activity attracted the attention of the bishop of Gloucester, who ordained Whitefield as a deacon, and later as a priest, in the Church of England. Whitefield finished his degree at Oxford and on June 20, 1736, Bishop Benson ordained him. The Bishop, placing his hands upon George's head, resulted in George's later declaration that "My heart was melted down and I offered my whole spirit, soul, and body to the service of God's sanctuary."

Whitefield was an astounding preacher from the beginning. Though he was slender in build, he stormed in the pulpit as if he were a giant. Within a year it was said that "his voice startled England like a trumpet blast." At a time when London had a population of less than 700,000, he could hold spellbound 20,000 people at a time at Moorfields and Kennington Common. For thirty-four years his preaching resounded throughout England and America. In his preaching ministry he crossed the Atlantic thirteen times and became known as the 'apostle of the British empire.'

He was a firm Calvinist in his theology yet unrivaled as an aggressive evangelist. Though a clergyman of the Church of England, he cooperated with and had a profound impact on people and churches of many traditions, including Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and Baptists. Whitefield, along with the Wesleys, inspired the movement that became known as the Methodists. Whitefield preached more than 18,000 sermons in his lifetime, an average of 500 a year or ten a week. Many of them were given over and over again. Fewer than 90 have survived in any form.

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Works by George Whitefield

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External Work.
14 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

External Work.
23 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

External Work.
40 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

External Work.
25 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

External Work.
8 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

An important figure in the founding of Methodism, George Whitefield has a gift for preaching. This collection of 59 sermons demonstrates that beyond question. Whitefield's sermons are ideal for personal and communal study. They cover a wide range of topics--from the benefits of piety to personal regeneration. Yet they do so with Whitefield's great passion, making them lively and engaging. Besides their historic importance, these sermons both capture the important theological insights of Whitefield's time and encourage believers to continue in their spiritual walk. A true blessing, this collection of sermons will uplift and teach at the same time.

External Work.
23 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

External Work.
3 editions published.

View on: WorldCat | Amazon

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Works About George Whitefield

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