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"A Little Circumstance"

It happened (to speak in the vulgar phrase) that three or four who sailed with us from England, a gentleman, with his wife and sister, were near relations of the Governor. He came to us this morning and, when I went into the room, behaved with the utmost courtesy. This little circumstance may remove prejudice, and make a more open way for the gospel.

Soon after we set sail and, after a very pleasant passage through little islands on either hand, we came to the venerable castle, standing on a rock about a quarter of a mile from Guernsey. The isle itself makes a beautiful appearance, spreading as a crescent to the right and left; about seven miles long and five broad; part high land, and part low. The town itself is boldly situated, rising higher and higher from the water. The first thing I observed in it was very narrow streets and exceedingly high houses. But we quickly went on to Mr. De Jersey's, hardly a mile from the town. Here I found a most cordial welcome, both from the master of the house and all his family. I preached at seven, in a large room, to as deeply serious a congregation as I ever saw.

Thursday, 16.--I had a very serious congregation at five, in a large room of Mr. De Jersey's house. His gardens and orchards are of a vast extent and wonderfully pleasant; and I know no nobleman in Great Britain that has such variety of the most excellent fruit; this he is every year increasing, either from France or other parts of the Continent. What a quantity of fruit he has you may conjecture from one sort only: this summer he gathered fifty pounds of strawberries daily, for six weeks together.

In the evening I preached at the other end of the town, in our own preaching-house. So many people squeezed in (though not near all who came), that it was as hot as a stove. But this none seemed to regard; for the Word of God was sharper than a two-edged sword.

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