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Wesley on "Boston Stump"

Friday, 16.--We went on to Boston, the largest town in the county, except Lincoln. From the top of the steeple (which I suppose is by far the highest tower in the kingdom) we had a view not only of all the town, but of all the adjacent country. Formerly this town was in the fens; but the fens are vanished away: a great part of them is turned into pasture, and part into arable land. At six the house contained the congregation, all of whom behaved in the most decent manner.

Wednesday, 28.--I went to Sheffield; but the house was not ready, so I preached in the square.

I can hardly think I am entered this day into the seventy-eight year of my age. By the blessing of God, I am just the same as when I entered the twenty-eighth. This hath God wrought, chiefly by my constant exercise, my rising early, and preaching morning and evening.

Monday, September 11.--As I drew near Bath, I wondered what had drawn such a multitude of people together, till I learned that one of the members for the city had given an ox to be roasted whole. But their sport was sadly interrupted by heavy rain, which sent them home faster than they came; many of whom dropped in at our chapel, where I suppose they never had been before.

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