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Wesley Preaches Whitefield's Funeral Sermon

Saturday, November 10.--I returned to London, and had the melancholy news of Mr. Whitefield's death confirmed by his executors, who desired me to preach his funeral sermon on Sunday, the eighteenth. In order to write this, I retired to Lewisham on Monday; and on Sunday following, went to the chapel in Tottenham Court Road. An immense multitude was gathered together from all corners of the town. I was at first afraid that a great part of the congregation would not be able to hear; but it pleased God so to strengthen my voice that even those at the door heard distinctly. It was an awful season: all were still as night; most appeared to be deeply affected; and an impression was made on many, which one would hope will not speedily be effaced.

The time appointed for my beginning at the Tabernacle was half-hour after five; but it was quite filled at three, so I began at four. At first the noise was exceedingly great; but it ceased when I began to speak; and my voice was again so strengthened that all who were within could hear, unless an accidental noise hindered here or there for a few moments. Oh, that all may hear the voice of Him with whom are the issues of life and death; and who so loudly, by this unexpected stroke, calls all His children to love one another!

Friday, 23.--Being desired by the trustees of the tabernacle at Greenwich to preach Mr. Whitefield's funeral sermon there, I went over today for that purpose; but neither would this house contain the congregation. Those who could not get in made some noise at first, but in a little while all were silent. Here, likewise, I trust God has given a blow to that bigotry which had prevailed for many years.

Monday, December 3.--l took a little journey into Kent. In the evening I preached at Chatham, in the new house, which was sufficiently crowded with attentive hearers.

Tuesday, 4.--l preached at Canterbury.

Wednesday, 5.--We went to Dover where, with some difficulty, we climbed to the top of Shakespeare's cliff. It is exceedingly high and commands a vast prospect both by sea and land; but it is nothing so terrible in itself as it is in his description. I preached to a very serious congregation in the evening as well as in the morning. The same, likewise, we observed at Canterbury; so that I hope to see good days here also.

Friday, 7.--l preached in Feversham at nine and in the evening at Chatham. So we go through water and firel And all is well, so we are doing or suffering the will of our Lotd!

Wednesday, 19.--About noon I preached at Dorking. The hearers were many and seemed all attention. About a hundred attended at Ryegate in the evening, and between twenty and thirty in the morning; dull indeed as stones.



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