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The Gentleman with Rotten Eggs

Friday, September 8.--I preached about nine at Taunton and then rode on to Bridgewater. This afternoon I went to the top of Brent Hill. I know not that I ever before saw such a prospect. Westward one may see to the mouth of the Bristol Channel; and the three other ways, as far as the eye can reach. And most of the land which you see is well cultivated, well wooded, and well watered; the globe of earth, in its present condition, can hardly afford a more pleasing scene.

Tuesday, 19.--Between twelve and one, I preached at Freshford; on White's Hill, near Bradford, in the evening. By this means many had an opportunity of hearing who would not have come to the room. I had designed to preach there again the next evening, but a gentleman in the town desired me to preach at his door. The beasts of the people were tolerably quiet till I had nearly finished my sermon. They then lifted up their voices, especially one, called a gentleman, who had filled his pocket with rotten eggs. But, a young man coming unawares clapped his hands on each side and mashed them all at once. In an instant he was perfume all over, though it was not so sweet as balsam.

Tuesday, October 24.--l preached at Alston, in a large maltroom, where one side of my head was very warm, through the crowd of people, the other very cold, having an open window at my ear. Between six and seven I preached at Northampton; and it was an awful season.

This evening there was such an aurora borealis as I never saw before; the colors, both the white, the flame color, and the scarlet, were exceedingly strong and beautiful. But they were awful too, and an abundance of people were frightened into many good resolutions.

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