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Wesley Opens a New Church

He received me with the most cordial affection and, after a time, said, "We have been building a new church, which my neighbors expected me to open; but if you please to do it, it will be as well." Hearing the bell, the people flocked together from all parts of the town, and "received the word with all readiness of mind." I saw the hand of God was in this, for the strengthening of this loving people.

Hence we rode through a pleasant country to Charlemount, where I preached to a very large and serious congregation. [We were gathered] near the fort, which has a ditch round it, with some face of a fortification; it probably (according to custom) costs the Government a thousand a year for not three farthings' service!

Thursday, 20.--I went on to Castle Caulfield and preached on the green adjoining to the castle, to a plain, serious people, who still retain all their earnestness and simplicity. Thence I rode to Cookstown, a town consisting of one street about a mile long, running directly through a bog. I preached to most of the inhabitants of the town; and so the next day, morning and evening. Many “received the word with gladness." Perhaps they will not all be stony-ground hearers.

We took the new road to Dungiven. But it was hard work.


Nigh founder'd, on we fated.

Treading the crude consistence.


We were nearly five hours going fourteen miles, partly on horseback, partly on foot. We had, as usual, a full house at Londonderry in the evening and again at eight on Sunday morning. In the afternoon we had a brilliant congregation. But such a sight gives me no great pleasure, as I have very little hope of doing them good; only with God all things are possible." Both this evening and the next I spoke exceedingly plain to the members of the society. In no other place in Ireland have more pains been taken by the most able of our preachers. And to how little purpose! Bands they have none: four-and-forty persons in society! The greater part of these heartless and cold. The audience in general dead as stones. However, we are to deliver our message; and let our Lord do as seemeth Hirn good.

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