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Wesley and His Barber

Thursday, April 11 (Bolton).—The barber who shaved me said, “Sir, I praise God on your behalf. When you were at Bolton last, I was one of the most eminent drunkards in all the town; but I came to listen at the window, and God struck me to the heart. I then earnestly prayed for power against drinking; and God gave me more than I asked: He took away the very desire of it. Yet I felt myself worse and worse, till on April 5 last, I could hold out no longer. I knew I must drop into hell that moment unless God appeared to save me: and He did appear. I knew He loved me and felt sweet peace. Yet I did not dare to say I had faith, till, yesterday was twelvemonth, God gave me faith; and His love has ever since filled my heart.”

Monday, 22.—The rain stopped while I was preaching at the market place in Morpeth. We rode from thence to Alnwick, where (it being too wet to preach at the Cross) some of our friends procured the Town Hall. This, being very large, contained the people well; only the number of them made it extremely hot.

Tuesday, 23.—We rode on to Berwick-upon-Tweed.

Wednesday, 24.—Mr. Hopper and I took horse between three and four and about seven came to Old Camus. Whether the country was good or bad we could not see, having a thick mist all the way. The Scotch towns are like none which I ever saw, either in England, Wales, or Ireland: there is such an air of antiquity in them all, and such a peculiar oddness in their manner of building. But we were most surprised at the entertainment we met with in every place, so far different from common report. We had all things good, cheap, in great abundance, and remarkably well-dressed. In the afternoon we rode by Preston Field and saw the place of battle and Colonel Gardiner’s house. The Scotch here affirm that he fought on foot after he was dismounted and refused to take quarter. Be it as it may, he is now where “the wicked cease from troubling, and [where] the weary are at rest” [Job 3:17].

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