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The Indian's Petition

12, 12, 12, 12, 11

This song, it is said, was composed by the son of a chief of one of the western tribes, who was sent to the City of Washington to make a treaty with the United States, which treaty was delayed for a while by some unavoidable circumstances.

1.

Let me go to my home in the far distant west,

To the scenes of my childhood, in innocence blest,

Where the tall cedars wave, and the bright waters flow,

Where my fathers repose, let me go, let me go,

Where my fathers repose, oh! there let me go.

2.

Let me go to the spot where the cataracts play,

Where I often have sported in boyhood's bright day,

And there greet my fond mother whose heart will o'erflow

At the sight of her child, let me go, let me go,

At the sight of her child, oh! there let me go.

3.

Let me go to my sire, by whose battle scarred side

I have sported so oft in the noon of new pride,

And exulted to conquer the insolent foe;

To my Father the chief, let me go, let me go,

To my father, the chief, oh! there let me go.

4.

And oh! do let me go to my flashing eyed maid,

Who hath taught me to love 'neath the green willow's shade;

Whose heart like the fawn leaps, and is pure as the snow:

To the bosom I love, let me go, let me go,

To the bosom I love, oh! there let me go.

5.

And, oh! do let me go to my wild forest home,

No more from its life cheering fond pleasures to roam

'Neath the grove of the glen let my ashes lie low,

To my home in the wood let me go, let me go

To my home in the wood, oh! there let me go.

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