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A TRUE COPY

OF THE

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT

OF

THE REV. DR. SOUTH.

DRAWN UP BY HIMSELF.

IN the name of God, Amen. I Robert South, prebendary of the collegiate church of St. Peter in Westminster, and doctor in divinity, being well in health, and of good and perfect memory; God be thanked for the same; do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following.

First, I recommend my soul to my most merciful God; my body to the earth, there to be buried in such decent manner, neither sumptuous nor sordid, as my executrix, hereafter to be named, shall think fit. And as touching such worldly estate as God hath blessed me with, I give and dispose of the same as followeth.

Imprimis, I give and bequeath to Robert South, gent. my nephew by the half blood, all my messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, descended to me by and from my father, and now rented by Elizabeth Brookes, widow of John Brookes, husbandman, lately deceased, at seventy-five pounds per annum, situate and being in Whittley, commonly called the hamlets of Whittley, in the parish of St. Giles in Reading, in the county of Berks, to have and to hold the same to him and his heirs for ever.

Provided always, and upon condition nevertheless, that the said Robert South my nephew, and his heirs, do and shall, within two years next after my decease, pay or cause ciito be paid unto Mrs. Elizabeth Kirkland, and to Mrs. Rachael Partridge, my nieces by the half blood, and sisters to the said Robert South, the sum of three hundred pounds apiece of lawful money of Great Britain, together with interest for the same from my decease, at the rate of five pounds per centum per annum. And also to pay or cause to be paid to Mrs. Rachael Taylor, only daughter of Mrs. Jane Taylor, one of my three nieces by the half blood, and sister to the said Robert South, my nephew, the further sum of three hundred pounds of like lawful money, together with interest for the same from my decease, at the rate of five pounds per cent, per annum. Upon this further condition nevertheless, that he the said Robert South my nephew, or his heirs, do or shall, within two years, or three at most, next after my decease, pay, or cause to be paid, to Mrs. Elizabeth Morris, and to Mrs. Elizabeth Terry, now or late in Antigua in the West Indies, and both of them daughters or granddaughters to Mrs. Joan Hall, several years since deceased, and one of my sisters by the half blood, or to the children of the said Elizabeth Morris and Elizabeth Terry respectively, in case those their mothers should not be living at the time of my decease, the sum of four hundred pounds of like lawful money, together with interest for the same from the time of my decease, at the rate of five pounds per cent, per annum, in manner following: that is to say, unto the said Elizabeth Morris, if at that time living, or if then dead, to such of her children as shall be then living; or in default of such children, to her executors or administrators; the sum of three hundred pounds, together with the yearly interest thereof at five pounds per cent, per annum, as before expressed: and likewise the remaining sum of one hundred pounds, with the like interest for the same, to the said Elizabeth Terry, though she never yet took the least notice of me by letter or otherwise, if she shall be living at the time of my decease; or if then dead, to such of her children as shall be then living at the time of it; or in default of such children, to her executors or administrators. And I do hereby charge all my said lands, messuages, tenements, ciiiand hereditaments in Whittley aforesaid, descended to me from my father, with the payment of the said several sums of three hundred pounds, and three hundred pounds, and three hundred pounds, and four hundred pounds, and the interest thereof, as aforesaid declared: and these are the conditions on which I give my said estate in Whittley in Berks, &c. to my nephew Robert South above mentioned, and upon no other conditions or terms whatsoever.

Item, I give and bequeath to Mrs. Margaret Hammond, my housekeeper, and widow or relict of Mr. Edward Hammond, clerk, deceased, all my messuages or tenements situate and being in and near Holyday-yard in London, which I hold by lease from the dean and chapter of St. Paul’s in London aforesaid, to hold the same unto the said Mrs. Margaret Hammond, her executors, administrators, and assigns, for and during the residue of the term of years which I shall have to come therein at the time of my death; though I could and do most heartily wish, that at or before her death she would give and settle the same to some charitable use for ever: and this to the great honour of Almighty God, the benefit of the public, to my own great satisfaction, the good of her own soul, and the just reputation of us to all posterity.

Item, I give and bequeath to the said Mrs. Margaret Hammond all my lands, messuages, tenements, or hereditaments, in or bordering upon the parish of Cavesham, alias Caversham, in the county of Oxon; and also all my messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, being copyhold estate of inheritance in the manor of Candors, alias Cantlow, in Kentish-town in the county of Middlesex, to have and to hold the said messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, both in Cavesham, alias Caversham, and in Kentishtown aforesaid, unto the said Mrs. Margaret Hammond, and her assigns, during her natural life, without impeachment of or for any manner of waste whatsoever, done or committed during her time of widowhood or single life only, which from my heart I desire she would continue in to her life’s end; and that for her own sake and interest, as well as civmy satisfaction, for that otherwise neither she nor I can tell what havock an husband will make upon the premises, nor what, if there be no such check upon him, can prevent his making it: and since my chief design here is charity, immediately after the death of Mrs. Margaret Hammond afore said, my housekeeper, I give and bequeath my two forementioned estates, viz. one in Kentish-town in the county of Middlesex, and the other in Cavesham, alias Caversham, in the county of Oxford aforesaid, to the reverend the dean and chapter of the cathedral and collegiate church of Christ in Oxon, and to their successors after them for ever; nevertheless in trust only, and for the uses following; namely, that out of the revenue of the said two estates, all repairs, taxes, and other necessary duties and expenses chargeable upon or incident to the same, shall by the said dean and chapter of Christ Church in Oxon, and their successors for ever, be still from time to time paid off and discharged. And further upon trust also, that after a due performance of this, the said dean and chapter of Christ Church, and their successors for ever, shall likewise from time to time pay out of the rents, issues, and profits of the premises, to and amongst certain vicars, curates, and incumbents for the time being, of the several vicarages and places herein aftermentioned, ten pounds apiece yearly for ever.

Viz. Ten pounds yearly to the vicar of Southstoke cum capellis in the county of Oxon, for the time being.

Item, The like sum of ten pounds yearly to the vicar of Norton Broyn, alias Brise Norton, in the county of Oxon, for the time being.

Item, To the vicar of East Garsdon in the county of Berks for the time being, the like yearly sum of ten pounds for ever,

Item, To the vicar of Nethersoll in the county of Gloucester for the time being, the like yearly sum of ten pounds for ever.

Item, To the vicar of Ardington in the county of Berks for the time being, the like yearly sum of ten pounds for ever.

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Item, To the vicar of Cerleton in the county of Wilts for the time being, the like yearly sum of ten pounds for ever.

Item, To the vicar of Little Compton in the county of Oxon for the time being, the like sum of ten pounds yearly for ever.

Item, To the curate of Drayton in the same county of Oxon for the time being, the like sum of ten pounds yearly for ever.

Item, To the curate of South Littleton in the county of Worcester for the time being, the like yearly sum of ten pounds for ever.

And to the curate of Offenham in the same county of Worcester for the time being, the like sum of ten pounds yearly for ever.

And to the curate of Stratton Audley in the county of Oxon for the time being, ten pounds yearly for ever.

And lastly, to the vicar or curate of Dorchester in the said county of Oxon, and seven miles from the city of Oxon, for the time being, the like sum of ten pounds yearly for ever. To all and every one of which the said persons I give and bequeath the forementioned yearly sum of ten pounds, free from all deductions and abatements for or by reason of taxes, or any other duties chargeable upon the premises whatsoever, to be paid them by the dean and chapter of Christ Church, and their successors for ever, at or upon the two most usual feasts; that is to say, on the feast of the Annunciation of the blessed Virgin Mary, and of St. Michael the archangel, by even and equal portions; and the first payment thereof to be accordingly made on the first of the said festivals which shall next and immediately follow the decease of my executrix. And my will also is, that in case the yearly rents and profits arising out of the premises so given to the dean and chapter of Christ Church, and their successors, should in any year happen to fall short of satisfying the said sum of ten pounds to each of the said vicars, curates, and incumbents aforesaid for the time being; then, and so often as this shall happen, there shall be an equal cviand proportionable abatement or deduction made out of every one of the said salaries or allowances. But if again, on the other side, it should in any following year or years so fall out, (as no doubt it will,) that there shall be more arising out of the yearly rents, incomes, and profits of the said premises so given to the dean and chapter of Christ Church, Oxon, and their successors, than what is sufficient to answer and satisfy the said yearly stipends and annuities, then my will is, that all deficiencies so happening in any former year or years shall be made up and supplied to the said vicars and incumbents out of such overplus. And further my will by all means is, that if any of the vicars, curates, or incumbents receiving this my charitable benefaction, shall be convicted of, at the mouth of two or more witnesses, or generally noted for, though not formally convicted thereof by witnesses, any thing grossly immoral, as whoredom, fornication, drunkenness, or common swearing, or any thing scandalous, or against the Act of Uniformity or rule of the church of Eng land, such as are preaching in or going to any conventicle, or meeting of dissenters from the church of England, for religious worship; that then, and in every such and the like case, the stipend, annuity, or pension allotted or given to such vicar, curate, or incumbent, shall forthwith cease, and the person or persons so guilty be utterly deprived of the same for ever: and that it be from time to time paid to such vicars, curates, or incumbents, as shall be so qualified as in the premises has been expressed, and shall be personally known to the dean himself, or to any one or more of the prebendaries of Christ Church, Oxon, aforesaid, for the time being, to be of a sober, unblameable life, and of strict conformity to the church of England, as now by law established. Finally, my positive will is, that the said dean and chapter of Christ Church, Oxon, and their successors, do and shall, after the yearly payments made to the twelve vicars, curates, or incumbents before mentioned, pay all the overplus of the money remaining of the yearly rents and profits of those my two estates bequeathed to the dean and chapter of Christ Church, Oxon, and their successors, to six poor scholars for cviiever, twenty nobles apiece, by even and equal portions, on the two forementioned festivals; and that the said poor scholars be all of them of Christ Church in Oxon, but bred and brought up in Westminster school, commonly called the king’s or queen’s school there. And those likewise to be of the sole choice and nomination of the dean and chapter of Christ Church, and their successors for ever. And my will and mind is, that when the said pensions or annuities shall have been paid, both to the ministers and poor scholars before mentioned, and all taxes and duties chargeable upon the premises cleared off, whatsoever money shall remain out of the rents and profits of my said two estates shall be wholly applied towards the finishing of the new buildings now carried on in Christ church and college in Oxon aforesaid. And now whereas I have bestowed a consider able part of my estate in erecting and endowing, at my sole charge and expense, a school in the parish of Islip in the county of Oxon, and by a particular deed vested the same in the dean and chapter of St. Peter’s church in Westminster, but yet nevertheless for the sole support, maintenance, and benefit of the said school; I do by these presents fully ratify and confirm the said deed of settlement in the said dean and chapter of St. Peter in Westminster, and their successors for ever, to and for all the trusts, uses, and conditions therein mentioned and contained. But to proceed. And I do herein, in the first place, give and bequeath to the dean and chapter of Christ Church in Oxon, and to their successors for ever, the full sum of five hundred pounds of good and lawful money of Great Britain, but so that the same be laid out by them in purchasing the perpetual advowson of a good living for one of the students of that college successively, who shall profess the study of divinity. And my will is, that the said sum be paid them by my executrix within five years after my decease. In the next place, I give also to the dean and chapter of the church of St. Asaph, &c. in North Wales, the sum of one hundred pounds of like lawful money of Great Britain, but still in trust, and upon condition only that the said sum be laid out cviiiby them for the apprenticing out twenty poor youths, born in the parish of Llanchaiadar in Mochnant aforesaid, to good honest trades, by five pounds apiece. And my will is, that the said sum of one hundred pounds be paid them by my executrix, when she shall have received of Mr. Robert Lloyd, of Aston in Salop, my tenant, for the tithes of Llanchaiadar, all that shall be due to me from him on that account; and not otherwise, nor before the full receipt thereof.

Item, I give and bequeath the sum of one hundred pounds of the like lawful money of Great Britain to the chancellor, doctors, and masters of arts of the university of Oxon, for the use and benefit of the public library of that place, and the buying into it such modern authors of principal note, as the vice-chancellor and head library-keeper for the time being shall judge both most useful and most wanting there. Likewise I give the sum of two hundred pounds of the like lawful current money of Great Britain to twenty poor ejected clergymen, non-jurors; and those at the sole choice and nomination of Mrs. Margaret Hammond, my executrix, to be distributed to them by ten pounds apiece.

Item, I give the like sum of two hundred pounds of the like current money as aforesaid to forty poor ministers’ widows, and those also of the sole choice and nomination of my aforementioned executrix, to be distributed to them by five pounds apiece; willing withal, and hereby requiring, that both the said clergymen and clergymen’s widows now mentioned be respectively paid the several sums here allotted them, within the term of two years at the utmost after my decease. Also I give and bequeath to the governors of the grey coat hospital here in Tuthill-fields, Westminster, the sum of one hundred pounds of the like lawful money as beforesaid, for and towards the maintenance of the poor children taught and bred up there. And here to look a little back again upon my affairs in Christ Church: whereas I have for several years last past, at a constant yearly salary, employed one Mr. Thomas Rookes, verger of Christ Church in Oxon, in managing my accounts, and some other of my concerns in and about Oxon, I give him the sum cixof twenty guineas, to be delivered to him by my executrix, after he has paid into her hands all monies which shall have been owing from him to me, and given back all papers and keys belonging to me, and cleared all accounts between him and me, to the full satisfaction of my said executrix, and not before, nor otherwise. And as for some other charities to the poor, I give as followeth:

Imprimis, I give and bequeath one hundred pounds of good and lawful money of Great Britain to fifty poor house keepers or widows, those of clergymen only excepted, as having been before in this my will provided for, within the city of Westminster, to be distributed to them by Mrs. Margaret Hammond, my housekeeper and executrix, by forty shillings apiece; and the said housekeepers and widows to be all of them at the sole choice and nomination of the said Mrs. Margaret Hammond; but still such as shall be truly conformable to our church, as now by law established, and diligent attenders upon the service and worship thereof, either at Westminster-abbey, which I most like, or in some parish church thereabouts: and this I would have done as speedily as it can with any tolerable convenience be after my funeral. Also to the poor of the parish of Cavesham, alias Caversham, in Oxfordshire, where I have dwelt for many years last past, I give ten pounds, having been all along very liberal to that place, and the poor thereof, during all the time I spent there. And to the poor of the town and parish of I slip in the county of Oxford also; to which I have been a constant and (as they themselves very well know) no ordinary benefactor. I give five pounds to the poor of the parish of Hackney in the county of Middlesex, near Lon don, where I was born and baptized. I give five pounds likewise to the poor of the place where I shall happen to be buried; (in case it proves to be none of those three places just now mentioned, I also give five pounds, but not other wise.) And all these sums I will to be distributed by my executrix accordingly, and as soon as with what possible expedition it can. And I give moreover to my servant, Clement Apthorp of Bedfordshire, the sum of fifty pounds, provided cxhe be actually in my service at the time of my decease. And I give also to him and the rest of my domestic servants continuing to serve me to that time, to each of them a suit of mourning, but so that the said mourning be bought and provided for them only by my executrix Mrs. Anne Hammond, and not otherwise. And not to forget here one who had lived in my service formerly, I give to Mrs. Grace Day, and to her son John Day, an apprentice in London, the sum of five pounds apiece, in remembrance of me. And now after all, for the better and surer performance of all these foregoing particulars, I do hereby constitute and appoint my housekeeper, Mrs. Margaret Hammond, sole executrix of this my last will and testament; she having served me for now above these five and thirty years, and that most faithfully and discreetly, having all along taken the greatest care of my health that could be, and, under God, more than once preserved my life, and rescued me from imminent and certain death; for which considerations, as greater could not possibly be, having made her, as here I do, my sole executrix, I do most heartily by these presents give and bequeath to her as such, my whole and remaining estate in money, plate, rings, jewels, and all my householdstuff, books, leases, and writings of all sorts, with an assignment from Mr. Gilbert Whitehall, citizen of London, to me upon the Exchequer; and in a word, all my goods and chattels whatsoever, not otherwise disposed of, or to be disposed of and given away by this my will and testament, or by any codicil annexed, or to be annexed to the same hereafter. In witness whereof, and of all the premises in this my last will and testament contained, and by which I utterly disannul and make void all former wills at any time before made by me, I do here set my hand and seal to the same, on this thirtieth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, and of her present majesty’s reign the thirteenth, Robert South. Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the said doctor Robert South, as and for his last will and testament, in the presence of us who have subscribed our names in the presence of him the cxisaid doctor South; the following words, viz. the word what, in page the third, line the thirteenth; the words should be, in page the fifth, line the sixteenth; the word back, in page the eighth, line the last; the words those of clergymen, in page the ninth, line the fifth; the word particulars, in page the tenth, line the eighth: all of them in the places noted being first interlined; James Bales, Richard Nurse, John Waiworth.

A Codicil to be annexed to my last will, and accounted as part of it.

WHEREAS I Robert South, doctor in divinity, have at several times past paid unto Mr. William Vernon, of Westminster, gentleman, the sum of six hundred and seventeen pounds thirteen shillings and ten pence, or thereabouts; for securing the repayment whereof with interest, the said William Vernon, by one or more deeds of assignment, did assign unto Mrs. Margaret Hammond, of Westminster, widow, in trust for me, a judgment obtained by him against dame Frances Atkins, widow, deceased, for the sum of nine hundred and seventy-seven pounds debt, or some such sum, besides cost of suit. Now I do give and bequeath all the monies which now are or shall become due to me upon the said judgment and security, unto Mrs. Margaret Hammond, my executrix, to her sole only and proper use and behoof for ever. But nevertheless upon this condition, that the said Mrs. Margaret Hammond, my executrix, do and shall, within three, or at most five years after she shall have received the same, pay unto the dean and chapter of Christ Church in Oxford for the time being, the sum of five hundred pounds for and towards their carrying on the buildings of that church and college. And whereas moreover I Robert South, doctor in divinity, on the seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, purchased of one Henry Clements, bookseller in St. Paul’s churchyard in London, three volumes of doctor Robert South’s sermons,, each of them containing twelve cxiisermons apiece, and entitled severally the first, second, and third volumes of the same, for one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings of lawful money of Great Britain, paid down to the said Henry Clements for that real or pretended right to the said volumes or copies, as having bought them, as he said, of one sir Thomas Gery, knight, and dame Elizabeth, his wife, widow of Thomas Bennet, bookseller, her first husband, and accordingly claiming them as his sole executrix, the said Bennet himself having likewise formerly pleaded a right to the same by virtue of a purchase of them from doctor Robert South, the author of them; which yet he the said doctor very much questions; I do hereby by these presents give and bequeath the aforesaid volumes and copies of my sermons so purchased by me, as has been expressed, to Mrs. Margaret Hammond, my housekeeper and executrix, to have and to hold, and in full right to dispose of the same according to her own will and pleasure for ever. And here, to leave also some small pledge at least of my respects to some of my particular friends; to wit, the honourable William Bromley, esquire, now principal secretary of state; and to the right reverend Dr. Francis Gastrell, lord bishop of Chester; and likewise to the reverend Dr. John Hammond, and doctor William Stratford, both of them canons of Christ Church in Oxon; I give and bequeath to every one of them severally five broad Carolus pieces of gold, to buy each of them a ring, to remember me their poor friend and servant by. To ah 1 which the foregoing particulars, contained in this codicil annexed to my last will and testament, as part of the same, I do here set my hand and seal this second day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, and of her present majesty queen Anne’s reign the thirteenth, Robert South. Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the said doctor Robert South, as and for part of his last will and testament, in the presence of us who have subscribed our names in the presence of the said doctor Robert South; James Eales, John Walworth, Richard Jones.

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A second codicil, to be annexed to my will bearing date on the thirtieth of March, one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, and to be accounted as part of the same.

WHEREAS I Robert South, doctor in divinity, and canon of the collegiate church of Christ in Oxon, of king Henry the eighth’s foundation, &c. have by my last testament, bearing date as aforesaid, already disposed of all or most of my real, and a great part of my personal estate after my decease, I do nevertheless by this codicil (which I do hereby annex to my said will, as part thereof) bestow upon the persons hereafter mentioned these following legacies.

Imprimis, I give to Mr. Robert South, of Northampton, attorney by profession, and son to my half-brother, Mr. James South, deceased, my father’s picture, drawn by the excellent hand of Vanzoest, and now hanging in my lodgings at Christ Church in Oxon; as also a gold ring set with a blue stone called an amethyst, with my father’s arms curiously engraved upon it; likewise a pebble-stone artificially set in a gold ring, (to be used as a seal,) with the same coat of arms cast or engraved in it; moreover, an agate of a pretty large size, and handle tipped with silver, and bearing my father’s arms also upon it, intended chiefly for the smoothing of written papers; and together with this, a small silver seal with the same engravement upon it, and commonly made use of by me in the sealing of my letters: which said legacies, whether he shall pass a due value upon them or no, (for I have heard of his character,) I have thought fit to leave him, as the properest things to remind him of the worthy father whom he is descended from, and the family which he belongs to, and deserves with the utmost respect to be remembered by him.

Item, I give to Mrs. Elizabeth Kirkland, the eldest sister of the said Robert South, &c. my wrought bed, (the work of my own dear sister Elizabeth, long since deceased,) together with the table, stands, stools, chairs, carpets, and covers respectively belonging to them; as likewise a walnut tree cabinet or scrutoire; first emptied of all things that were cxivin it, and standing in the back chamber in my house at Westminster. Also I give her a pair of silver candlesticks, with snuffing-pan, snuffers, and extinguisher belonging to them; all legacies I am sure (whatsoever else I had once in tended her) are a great deal more than either she or most of her other relations (so like one another for their constant disregard of me) do or can pretend to deserve of me.

Item, I give to the second sister of the said Robert South, named Rachael Partridge, (as I remember,) one of my silver tankards, at the choice of my executrix, and a silver cup with a snake on the cover of it, and two silver tumblers; also a set of damask linen, reckoning to a set, one table cloth, one sideboard cloth, and twelve napkins, and no more; and all at the choice of my executrix, Mrs. Margaret Hammond. And as for a third sister which he once had, named Jane, (she having been some years since dead, and having left behind her one only daughter, named Jane Taylor,) I give to the said Jane Taylor my pearl cabinet, and a black ebony dressing box, (all things being first taken out of both of them,) together with a curiously-wrought silver and crystal candlestick, with the black leathern case be longing to it; and likewise a suit of diaper linen belonging to me, and containing one table-cloth, one sideboard cloth, twelve napkins, and no more; but still all these, as well as those aforementioned, to be chosen only by my executrix; from whom also this Mrs. Jane Taylor is to receive five broad Carolus pieces of gold, with one silver coronation medal of queen Anne, as a further testimony of my good will towards her.

Item, To Mrs. Elizabeth Morris, of Antigua in the West Indies, and wife to captain Valentine Morris, and granddaughter to my sister by the half-blood, Mrs. Joan Hall, formerly living in the same place, I give as follows, viz. two silver porringers, six silver forks and salts; and with all those, two very fine pieces of wrought and gilt plate, bought by me at Dantzick, in my travels into Poland, with the two reddish leathern cases at first made for them, and fittest to preserve them in. These, I say, I bequeath to her after my cxvdeath, in case they should not be given or delivered to her before. Lastly, To my near kinswoman and cousin-german by the mother’s side, dame Phebe Hardress, of Kent, I bequeath her grandfather’s and grandmother Berry’s pictures at large, and with gilt frames, together with one of her uncle captain John Berry, and another of Mr. Jeffery Berry, drawn in his minority, both of them of a less size and proportion; and likewise a gold seal ring with her grandfather’s arms neatly engraven upon it; things very proper (if as friendly accepted, as they are offered) to remember her worthy family and relations by. To all which the foregoing particulars contained in this second codicil, annexed to my last will and testament as part thereof, I do here set my hand and seal, on this second day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, and of her present majesty queen Anne’s reign the thirteenth. Robert South. Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the said Dr. Robert South, as and for part of his last will and testament, in the presence of us who have here subscribed our names in the presence of the said doctor Robert South; the word pictures being first interlined towards the bottom of the leaf next and immediately before this; James Eales, John Walworth, Richard Jones.

A third codicil, to be annexed to my last will and testament, and reckoned as part of the same.

WHEREAS I Robert South, doctor in divinity, and prebendary of the collegiate church of St. Peter in Westminster, have made my last will and testament, bearing date on the thirtieth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, and duly signed and sealed the same, and got it attested and subscribed by three sufficient witnesses. And whereas after that, I likewise made and annexed two codicils to the said will, as part thereof, both of them bearing date the second day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen; and the same being then also signed and sealed cxviby myself, and duly attested by three sufficient witnesses; these are to certify and make known to all men, that I do by these presents ratify and confirm my said will, and the two codicils annexed to it, so signed and subscribed, as before expressed, as my true and lawful acts and deeds, and fully containing my whole mind and last will in all the particulars therein expressed; and that to all intents and purposes whatsoever. And accordingly I do here set my hand and seal to this my third codicil, and annex it in like manner to my last will, adding it to the two other codicils, as equally part of my will with them. And this I do on the

day of in the year of our Lord

and of her present majesty’s reign the


The 24th day of July, 1716.

APPEARED personally Jonah Bowyer, of the parish of St. Bridget, London, bookseller; and being sworn upon the holy evangelists to depose the truth, did depose as follows: viz. That he was very well acquainted with the reverend doctor Robert South, and his manner and character of hand-writing, having often seen him write, and having viewed the codicil or paper, number three, hereunto annexed, beginning thus, “A third codicil, to be annexed to my last will and testament, and reckoned as part of the same. Whereas I Robert South, doctor in divinity, and prebendary of the collegiate church of St. Peter’s in Westminster,” &c. and ending thus, “And accordingly I do here set my hand and seal to this my third codicil, and annex it in like manner to my last will, adding it to the two other codicils, as equally part of my will with them. And this I do on the    day of    in the year of our Lord and of her present majesty’s reign the    does, as he verily believes, and has been credibly informed, think the same to be all wrote with the proper hand of the said doctor Robert South. Jonah Bowyer. Die praedict. dictus Jonah Bowyer juratus fuit super veritate premissorum coram me Gulielmo Strahan, snrrog. &c.

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