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Sermon XLII.

On Lent, IV.

I.  The Lenten fast an opportunity for restoring our purity.

In proposing to preach this most holy and important fast to you, dearly beloved, how shall I begin more fitly than by quoting the words of the Apostle, in whom Christ Himself was speaking, and by reminding you of what we have read921921    Cf. Serm. XL. chap. ii. n. 5.:  “behold, now is the acceptable time, behold now is the day of salvation.”  For though there are no seasons which are not full of Divine blessings, and though access is ever open to us to God’s mercy through His grace, yet now all men’s minds should be moved with greater zeal to spiritual progress, and animated by larger confidence, when the return of the day, on which we were redeemed, invites us to all the duties of godliness:  that we may keep the super-excellent mystery of the Lord’s passion with bodies and hearts purified.  These great mysteries do indeed require from us such unflagging devotion and unwearied reverence that we should remain in God’s sight always the same, as we ought to be found on the Easter feast itself.  But because few have this constancy, and, because so long as the stricter observance is relaxed in consideration of the frailty of the flesh, and so long as one’s interests extend over all the various actions of this life, even pious hearts must get some soils from the dust of the world, the Divine Providence has with great beneficence taken care that the discipline of the forty days should heal us and restore the purity of our minds, during which the faults of other times might be redeemed by pious acts and removed by chaste fasting.

II.  Lent must be used for removing all our defilements, and of good works there must be no stint.

As we are therefore, dearly-beloved, about to enter on those mystic days which are dedicated to the benefits of fasting, let us take care to obey the Apostle’s precepts, cleansing “ourselves from every defilement of flesh and spirit922922    2 Cor. vii. 1.:”  that by controlling the struggles that go on between our two natures, the spirit which, if it is under the guidance of God, should be the governor of the body, may uphold the dignity of its rule:  so that we may give no offence to any, nor be subject to the chidings of reprovers.  For we shall be rightly attacked with rebukes, and through our fault ungodly tongues will arm themselves to do harm to religion, if the conduct of those that fast is at variance with the standard of perfect purity.  For our fast does not consist chiefly of mere abstinence from food, nor are dainties withdrawn from our bodily appetites with profit, unless the mind is recalled from wrong-doing and the tongue restrained from slandering.  This is a time of gentleness and long-suffering, of peace and tranquillity:  when all the pollutions of vice are to be eradicated and continuance of virtue is to be attained by us.  Now let godly minds boldly accustom themselves to forgive faults, to pass over insults, and to forget wrongs.  Now let the faithful spirit train himself with the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left, that through honour and dishonour, through ill repute and good repute, the conscience may be undisturbed in unwavering uprightness, not puffed up by praise and not wearied out by revilings.  The self-restraint of the religious should not be gloomy, but sincere; no murmurs of complaint should be heard from those who are never without the consolation of holy joys.  The decrease of worldly means should not be feared in the practice of works of mercy.  Christian poverty is always rich, because what it has is more than what it has not.  Nor does the poor man fear to labour in this world, to whom it is given to possess all things in the Lord of all things.  Therefore those who do the things which are good must have no manner of fear lest the power of doing should fail them; since in the gospel the widow’s devotion is extolled in the case of her two mites, and voluntary bounty gets its reward for a cup of cold water923923    The reffs. are obviously to S. Luke xxi. 2–4, and S. Matt. x. 42 (q.v.)..  For the measure of our charitableness is fixed by the sincerity of our feelings, and he that shows mercy on others will never want for mercy himself.  The holy widow of Sarepta discovered this, who offered the blessed Elias in the time of famine one day’s food, which was all she had, and putting the prophet’s hunger before her own needs, ungrudgingly gave up a handful of corn and a little oil924924    Cf. 1 Kings xvii. 11 and foll..  But she did not lose 157what she gave in all faith, and in the vessels emptied by her godly bounty a source of new plenty arose, that the fulness of her substance might not be diminished by the holy purpose to which she had put it, because she had never dreaded being brought to want.

III.  As with the Saviour, so with us, the devil tries to make our very piety its own snare.

But, dearly-beloved, doubt not that the devil, who is the opponent of all virtues, is jealous of these good desires, to which we are confident you are prompted of your own selves, and that to this end he is arming the force of his malice in order to make your very piety its own snare, and endeavouring to overcome by boastfulness those whom he could not defeat by distrustfulness.  For the vice of pride is a near neighbour to good deeds, and arrogance ever lies in wait hard by virtue:  because it is hard for him that lives praise-worthily not to be caught by man’s praise unless, as it is written, “he that glorieth, glorieth in the Lord925925    1 Cor. x. 17..”  Whose intentions would that most naughty enemy not dare to attack? whose fasting would he not seek to break down? seeing that, as has been shown in the reading of the Gospel926926    Cf. Serm. XXXVI. chap. i., note 7., he did not restrain his wiles even against the Saviour of the world Himself.  For being exceedingly afraid of His fast, which lasted 40 days and nights, he wished most cunningly to discover whether this power of abstinence was given Him or His very own:  for he need not fear the defeat of all his treacherous designs, if Christ were throughout subject to the same conditions as He is in body927927    Si Christus eius esset conditionis cuius est corporis, an obscurely expressed but intrinsically clear statement..  And so he first craftily examined whether He were Himself the Creator of all things, such that He could change the natures of material things as He pleased:  secondly, whether under the form of human flesh the Godhead lay concealed, to Whom it was easy to make the air His chariot, and convey His earthly limbs through space.  But when the Lord preferred to resist him by the uprightness of His true Manhood, than to display the power of His Godhead, to this he turns the craftiness of his third design, that he might tempt by the lust of empire Him in Whom the signs of Divine power had failed, and entice Him to the worship of himself by promising the kingdoms of the world.  But the devil’s cleverness was rendered foolish by God’s wisdom, so that the proud foe was bound by that which he had formerly bound, and did not fear to assail Him Whom it behoved to be slain for the world.

IV.  The perverse turn even their fasting into sin.

This adversary’s wiles then let us beware of, not only in the enticements of the palate, but also in our purpose of abstinence.  For he who knew how to bring death upon mankind by means of food, knows also how to harm us through our very fasting, and using the Manichæans as his tools, as he once drove men to take what was forbidden, so in the opposite direction he prompts them to avoid what is allowed.  It is indeed a helpful observance, which accustoms one to scanty diet, and checks the appetite for dainties:  but woe to the dogmatizing of those whose very fasting is turned to sin.  For they condemn the creature’s nature to the Creator’s injury, and maintain that they are defiled by eating those things of which they contend the devil, not God, is the author:  although absolutely nothing that exists is evil, nor is anything in nature included in the actually bad.  For the good Creator made all things good and the Maker of the universe is one, “Who made the heaven and the earth, the sea and all that is in them928928    Ps. cxlvi. 6..”  Of which whatever is granted to man for food and drink, is holy and clean after its kind.  But if it is taken with immoderate greed, it is the excess that disgraces the eaters and drinkers, not the nature of the food or drink that defiles them.  “For all things,” as the Apostle says, “are clean to the clean.  But to the defiled and unbelieving nothing is clean, but their mind and conscience is defiled929929    Titus i. 15..”

V.  Be reasonable and seasonable in your fasting.

But ye, dearly-beloved, the holy offspring of the catholic Mother, who have been taught in the school of Truth by God’s Spirit, moderate your liberty with due reasonableness, knowing that it is good to abstain even from things lawful, and at seasons of greater strictness to distinguish one food from another with a view to giving up the use of some kinds, not to condemning their nature.  And so be not infected with the error of those who are corrupted merely by their own ordinances, “serving the creature rather than the Creator930930    Rom. ix. 26.,” and offering a foolish abstinence to the service of the lights of heaven:  seeing that they have chosen to fast on the first and second days of the week in honour of the sun and moon, proving themselves in this one instance of their perverseness twice disloyal to God, twice blasphemous, by setting up their 158fast not only in worship of the stars but also in contempt of the Lord’s Resurrection.  For they reject the mystery of man’s salvation and refuse to believe that Christ our Lord in the true flesh of our nature was truly born, truly suffered, was truly buried and was truly raised.  And in consequence, condemn the day of our rejoicing by the gloom of their fasting.  And since to conceal their infidelity they dare to be present at our meetings, at the Communion of the Mysteries931931    In sacramentorum communione. they bring themselves sometimes, in order to ensure their concealment, to receive Christ’s Body with unworthy lips, though they altogether refuse to drink the Blood of our Redemption.  And this we make known to you, holy brethren, that men of this sort may be detected by you by these signs, and that they whose impious pretences have been discovered may be driven from the society of the saints by priestly authority.  For of such the blessed Apostle Paul in his foresight warns God’s Church, saying:  “but we beseech you, brethren, that ye observe those who make discussions and offences contrary to the doctrine which ye learnt and turn away from them.  For such persons serve not Christ the Lord but their own belly, and by sweet words and fair speeches beguile the hearts of the innocent932932    Rom. xvi. 17, 18..”

VI.  Make your fasting a reality by amendment in your lives.

Being therefore, dearly-beloved, fully instructed by these admonitions of ours, which we have often repeated in your ears in protest against abominable error, enter upon the holy days of Lent with Godly devoutness, and prepare yourselves to win God’s mercy by your own works of mercy.  Quench your anger, wipe out enmities, cherish unity, and vie with one another in the offices of true humility.  Rule your slaves and those who are put under you with fairness, let none of them be tortured by imprisonment or chains.  Forego vengeance, forgive offences:  exchange severity for gentleness, indignation for meekness, discord for peace.  Let all men find us self-restrained, peaceable, kind:  that our fastings may be acceptable to God.  For in a word to Him we offer the sacrifice of true abstinence and true Godliness, when we keep ourselves from all evil:  the Almighty God helping us through all, to Whom with the Son and Holy Spirit belongs one Godhead and one Majesty, for ever and ever.  Amen.


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