« Prev Of his Son Constantine, who in his Youth… Next »

Chapter XIX.—Of his Son Constantine, who in his Youth accompanied Diocletian into Palestine.

The latter had been with his father’s imperial colleagues,30893089    Diocletian and Galerius. and had passed his life among them, as we have said, like God’s ancient prophet. And even in the very earliest period of his youth he was judged by them to be worthy of the highest honor. An instance of this we have ourselves seen, when he passed through Palestine with the senior emperor,30903090    Diocletian. He was on his way to Egypt in the famous campaign against Achilleus in 296–297. at whose right hand he stood, and commanded the admiration of all who beheld him by the indications he gave even then of royal greatness. For no one was comparable to him for grace and beauty of person, or height of stature; and he so far surpassed his compeers in personal strength as to be a terror to them. He was, however, even more conspicuous for the excellence of his mental30913091    Or “psychical,” meaning more than intellectual. qualities than for his superior physical endowments; being gifted in the first place with a sound judgment,30923092    Rather, perhaps, “self-control.” and having also reaped the advantages of a liberal education. He was 488also distinguished in no ordinary degree both by natural intelligence and divinely imparted wisdom.


« Prev Of his Son Constantine, who in his Youth… Next »





Advertisements



| Define | Popups: Login | Register | Prev Next | Help |