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Chapter 18.—Of Those Who Fancy That, on Account of the Saints’ Intercession, Man Shall Be Damned in the Last Judgment.

There are others, again, with whose opinions I have become acquainted in conversation, who, though they seem to reverence the holy Scriptures, are yet of reprehensible life, and who accordingly, in their own interest, attribute to God a still greater compassion towards men.  For they acknowledge that it is truly predicted in the divine word that the wicked and unbelieving are worthy of punishment, but they assert that, when the judgment comes, mercy will prevail.  For, say they, God, having compassion on them, will give them up to the prayers and intercessions of His saints.  For if the saints used to pray for them when they suffered from their cruel hatred, how much more will they do so when they see them prostrate and humble suppliants?  For we cannot, they say, believe that the saints shall lose their bowels of compassion when they have attained the most perfect and complete holiness; so that they who, when still sinners, prayed for their enemies, should now, when they are freed from sin, withhold from interceding for their suppliants.  Or shall God refuse to listen to so many of His beloved children, when their holiness has purged their prayers of all hindrance to His answering them?  And the passage of the psalm which is cited by those who admit that wicked men and infidels shall be punished for a long time, though in the end 467 delivered from all sufferings, is claimed also by the persons we are now speaking of as making much more for them.  The verse runs:  “Shall God forget to be gracious?  Shall He in anger shut up His tender mercies?”15301530    Ps. lxxvii. 9.  His anger, they say, would condemn all that are unworthy of everlasting happiness to endless punishment.  But if He suffer them to be punished for a long time, or even at all, must He not shut up His tender mercies, which the Psalmist implies He will not do?  For he does not say, Shall He in anger shut up His tender mercies for a long period? but he implies that He will not shut them up at all.

And they deny that thus God’s threat of judgment is proved to be false even though He condemn no man, any more than we can say that His threat to overthrow Nineveh was false, though the destruction which was absolutely predicted was not accomplished.  For He did not say, “Nineveh shall be overthrown if they do not repent and amend their ways,” but without any such condition He foretold that the city should be overthrown.  And this prediction, they maintain, was true because God predicted the punishment which they deserved, although He was not to inflict it.  For though He spared them on their repentance yet He was certainly aware that they would repent, and, notwithstanding, absolutely and definitely predicted that the city should be overthrown.  This was true, they say, in the truth of severity, because they were worthy of it; but in respect of the compassion which checked His anger, so that He spared the suppliants from the punishment with which He had threatened the rebellious, it was not true.  If, then, He spared those whom His own holy prophet was provoked at His sparing, how much more shall He spare those more wretched suppliants for whom all His saints shall intercede?  And they suppose that this conjecture of theirs is not hinted at in Scripture, for the sake of stimulating many to reformation of life through fear of very protracted or eternal sufferings, and of stimulating others to pray for those who have not reformed.  However, they think that the divine oracles are not altogether silent on this point; for they ask to what purpose is it said, “How great is Thy goodness which Thou hast hidden for them that fear Thee,”15311531    Ps. xxxi. 19. if it be not to teach us that the great and hidden sweetness of God’s mercy is concealed in order that men may fear?  To the same purpose they think the apostle said, “For God hath concluded all men in unbelief, that He may have mercy upon all,”15321532    Rom. xi. 32. signifying that no one should be condemned by God.  And yet they who hold this opinion do not extend it to the acquittal or liberation of the devil and his angels.  Their human tenderness is moved only towards men, and they plead chiefly their own cause, holding out false hopes of impunity to their own depraved lives by means of this quasi compassion of God to the whole race.  Consequently they who promise this impunity even to the prince of the devils and his satellites make a still fuller exhibition of the mercy of God.


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