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Chapter 16.—Concerning Apollo and Diana, and the Other Select Gods Whom They Would Have to Be Parts of the World.

Although they would have Apollo to be a diviner and physician, they have nevertheless given him a place as some part of the world.  They have said that he is also the sun; and likewise they have said that Diana, his sister, is the moon, and the guardian of roads.  Whence also they will have her be a virgin, because a road brings forth nothing.  They also make both of them have arrows, because those two planets send their rays from the heavens to the earth.  They make Vulcan to be the fire of the world; Neptune the waters of the world; Father Dis, that is, Orcus, the earthy and lowest part of the world.  Liber and Ceres they set over seeds,—the former over the seeds of males, the latter over the seeds of females; or the one over the fluid part of seed, but the other over the dry part.  And all this together is referred to the world, that is, to Jupiter, who is called “progenitor and mother,” because he emitted all seeds from himself, and received them into himself.  For they also make this same Ceres to be the Great Mother, who they say is none other than the earth, and call her also Juno.  And therefore they assign to her the second causes of things, notwithstanding that it has been said to Jupiter, “progenitor and mother of the gods;” because, according to them, the whole world itself is Jupiter’s.  Minerva, also, because they set her over human arts, and did not find even a star in which to place her, has been said by them to be either the highest ether, or even the moon.  Also Vesta herself they have thought to be the highest of 132 the goddesses, because she is the earth; although they have thought that the milder fire of the world, which is used for the ordinary purposes of human life, not the more violent fire, such as belongs to Vulcan, is to be assigned to her.  And thus they will have all those select gods to be the world and its parts,—some of them the whole world, others of them its parts; the whole of it Jupiter,—its parts, Genius, Mater Magna, Sol and Luna, or rather Apollo and Diana, and so on.  And sometimes they make one god many things; sometimes one thing many gods.  Many things are one god in the case of Jupiter; for both the whole world is Jupiter, and the sky alone is Jupiter, and the star alone is said and held to be Jupiter.  Juno also is mistress of second causes,—Juno is the air, Juno is the earth; and had she won it over Venus, Juno would have been the star.  Likewise Minerva is the highest ether, and Minerva is likewise the moon, which they suppose to be in the lowest limit of the ether.  And also they make one thing many gods in this way.  The world is both Janus and Jupiter; also the earth is Juno, and Mater Magna, and Ceres.

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