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Chapter 29.—An Exhortation to the Romans to Renounce Paganism.

This, rather, is the religion worthy of your desires, O admirable Roman race,—the progeny of your Scævolas and Scipios, of Regulus, and of Fabricius.  This rather covet, this distinguish from that foul vanity and crafty malice of the devils.  If there is in your nature any eminent virtue, only by true piety is it purged and perfected, while by impiety it is wrecked and punished.  Choose now what you will pursue, that your praise may be not in yourself, but in the true God, in whom is no error.  For of popular glory you have had your share; but by the secret providence of God, the true religion was not offered to your choice.  Awake, it is now day; as you have already awaked in the persons of some in whose perfect virtue and sufferings for the true faith we glory:  for they, contending on all sides with hostile powers, and conquering them all by bravely dying, have purchased for us this country of ours with their blood; to which country we invite you, and exhort you to add yourselves to the number of the citizens of this city, which also has a sanctuary118118    Alluding to the sanctuary given to all who fled to Rome in its early days. of its own in the true remission of sins. 42 Do not listen to those degenerate sons of thine who slander Christ and Christians, and impute to them these disastrous times, though they desire times in which they may enjoy rather impunity for their wickedness than a peaceful life.  Such has never been Rome’s ambition even in regard to her earthly country.  Lay hold now on the celestial country, which is easily won, and in which you will reign truly and for ever.  For there shall thou find no vestal fire, no Capitoline stone, but the one true God.

“No date, no goal will here ordain:

But grant an endless, boundless reign.”119119    Virgil, Æneid, i. 278.

No longer, then, follow after false and deceitful gods; abjure them rather, and despise them, bursting forth into true liberty.  Gods they are not, but malignant spirits, to whom your eternal happiness will be a sore punishment.  Juno, from whom you deduce your origin according to the flesh, did not so bitterly grudge Rome’s citadels to the Trojans, as these devils whom yet ye repute gods, grudge an everlasting seat to the race of mankind.  And thou thyself hast in no wavering voice passed judgment on them, when thou didst pacify them with games, and yet didst account as infamous the men by whom the plays were acted.  Suffer us, then, to assert thy freedom against the unclean spirits who had imposed on thy neck the yoke of celebrating their own shame and filthiness.  The actors of these divine crimes thou hast removed from offices of honor; supplicate the true God, that He may remove from thee those gods who delight in their crimes,—a most disgraceful thing if the crimes are really theirs, and a most malicious invention if the crimes are feigned.  Well done, in that thou hast spontaneously banished from the number of your citizens all actors and players.  Awake more fully:  the majesty of God cannot be propitiated by that which defiles the dignity of man.  How, then, can you believe that gods who take pleasure in such lewd plays, belong to the number of the holy powers of heaven, when the men by whom these plays are acted are by yourselves refused admission into the number of Roman citizens even of the lowest grade?  Incomparably more glorious than Rome, is that heavenly city in which for victory you have truth; for dignity, holiness; for peace, felicity; for life, eternity.  Much less does it admit into its society such gods, if thou dost blush to admit into thine such men.  Wherefore, if thou wouldst attain to the blessed city, shun the society of devils.  They who are propitiated by deeds of shame, are unworthy of the worship of right-hearted men.  Let these, then, be obliterated from your worship by the cleansing of the Christian religion, as those men were blotted from your citizenship by the censor’s mark.

But, so far as regards carnal benefits, which are the only blessings the wicked desire to enjoy, and carnal miseries, which alone they shrink from enduring, we will show in the following book that the demons have not the power they are supposed to have; and although they had it, we ought rather on that account to despise these blessings, than for the sake of them to worship those gods, and by worshipping them to miss the attainment of these blessings they grudge us.  But that they have not even this power which is ascribed to them by those who worship them for the sake of temporal advantages, this, I say, I will prove in the following book; so let us here close the present argument.


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