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5.  There Were Two Embassies to John the Baptist; The Different Characters of These.

Here the enquiry suggests itself whether the second testimony is concluded, and whether there is a third, addressed to those who were sent from the Pharisees.  They wished to know why he baptized, if he was neither the Christ, nor Elijah, nor the prophet; and he said:48354835    John i. 25 sqq.  “I baptize with water; but there standeth one among you whom you know not, He that cometh after me, the latchet of whose shoe I am not worthy to unloose.”  Is this a third testimony, or is this which they were to report to the Pharisees a part of the second?  As far as the words allow me to conjecture I should say that the word to the emissaries of the Pharisees was a third testimony.  It is to be observed, however, that the first testimony asserts the divinity of the Saviour, while the second disposes of the suspicion of those who were in doubt whether John could be the Christ, and the third declares one who was already present with men although they saw Him not, and whose coming was no longer in the future.  Before going on to the subsequent testimonies in which he points out Christ and witnesses to Him, let us look at the second and third, word for word, and let us, in the first place, observe that there are two embassies to the Baptist, one “from Jerusalem” from the Jews, who send priests and levites, to ask him, “Who art thou?” the second sent by the Pharisees,48364836    Ver. 24. who were in doubt about the answer which had been made to the priests and levites.  Observe how what is said by the first envoys is in keeping with the character of priests and levites, and shows gentleness and a willingness to learn.  “Who art thou?” they say, and “What then? art thou Elijah?” and “Art thou that prophet?” and then, “Who art thou, that we may give an answer to them that sent us?  What sayest thou of thyself?”  There is nothing harsh or arrogant in the enquiries of these men; everything agrees well with the character of true and careful servants of God; and they raise no difficulties about the replies made to them.  Those, on the contrary, who are sent from the Pharisees assail the Baptist, as it were, with arrogant and unsympathetic words:  “Why then baptizest thou if thou be not the Christ nor Elijah nor the prophet?”  This mission is sent scarcely for the sake of information, as in the former case of the priests and levites, but rather to debar the Baptist from baptizing, as if it were thought that no one was entitled to baptize but Christ and Elijah and the prophet.  The student who desires to understand the Scripture must always proceed in this careful way; he must ask with regard to each speech, who is the speaker and on what occasion it was spoken.  Thus only can we discern how speech harmonizes with the character of the speaker, as it does all through the sacred books.


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