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Chapter XXXII.—The Golden Rule.

“But he is righteous who for the sake of what is reasonable fights with nature.  For example, it is natural to all to love those who love them.  But the righteous man tries also to love his enemies and to bless those who slander him, and even to pray for his enemies, and to compassionate those who do him wrong.  Wherefore also he refrains from doing wrong, and blesses those who curse him, pardons those who strike him, and submits to those who persecute him, and salutes those who do not salute him, shares such things as he has with those who have not, persuades him that is angry with him, conciliates his enemy, exhorts the disobedient, instructs the unbelieving, comforts the mourner; being distressed, he endures; being ungratefully treated, he is not angry.  But having devoted himself to love his neighbour as himself, he is not afraid of poverty, but becomes poor by sharing his possessions with those who have none.  But neither does he punish the sinner.  For he who loves his neighbour as himself, as he knows that when he has sinned he does not wish to be punished, so neither does he punish those who sin.  And as he wishes to be praised, and blessed, and honoured, and to have all his sins forgiven, thus he does to his neighbour, loving him as himself.11541154    Matt. xxii. 39.  In one word, what he wishes for himself, he wishes also for his neighbour.  For this is the law of God and of the prophets11551155    Matt. vii. 12. this is the doctrine of truth.  And this perfect love towards every man is the male part of philanthropy, but the female part of it is compassion; that is, to feed the hungry, to give drink to the thirsty, to clothe the naked, to visit the sick, to take in the stranger, to show herself to, and help to the utmost of her power, him who is in prison,11561156    Matt. xxv. 35, 36. and, in short, to have compassion on him who is in misfortune.”


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