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Chapter XIX.—God’s Peculiar Attribute.

“He who would worship God ought before all things to know what alone is peculiar to the nature of God, which cannot pertain to another, that, looking at His peculiarity, and not finding it in any other, he may not be seduced into ascribing godhead to another.  But this is peculiar to God, that He alone is, as the Maker of all, so also the best of all.  That which makes is indeed superior in power to that which is made; that which is boundless is superior in magnitude to that which is bounded:  in respect of beauty, that which is comeliest; in respect of happiness, that which is most blessed; in respect of understanding, that which is most perfect.  And in like manner, in other respects, He has incomparably the pre-eminence.  Since then, as I said, this very thing, viz., to be the best of all, is peculiar to God, and the all-comprehending world was made by Him, none of the things made by Him can come into equal comparison with Him.

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