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Chapter IV.—Faith and Duty.

“While, therefore, he was righteous, he was also superior to all sufferings, as being unable by his immortal body to have any experience of pain; but when he sinned, as I showed you yesterday and the day before, becoming as it were the servant of sin, he became subject to all sufferings, being by a righteous judgment deprived of all excellent things.  For it was not reasonable, the Giver having been forsaken, that the gifts should remain with the ungrateful.  Whence, of His abundant mercy, in order to our receiving, with the first, also future blessings, He sent His Prophet.  And the Prophet has given in charge to us to tell you what you ought to think, and what to do.  Choose, therefore; and this is in your power.  What, therefore, you ought to think is this, to worship the God who made all things; whom if you receive in your minds, you shall receive from Him, along with the first excellent things, also the future eternal blessings.

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