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Chapter VII.—The Two Paths.

“Knowing, then, these good and evil deeds, I make known unto you as it were two paths,10831083    [Compare with this chapter the recently discovered “Teaching” and Apostolic Constitutions, book vii. chap. 1, in vol. vii. pp. 377, 465.—R.] and I shall show you by which travellers are lost and by which they are saved, being guided of God.  The path of the lost, then, is broad and very smooth—it ruins them without troubling them; but the path of the saved is narrow, rugged, and in the end it saves, not without much toil, those who have journeyed through it.  And these two paths are presided over by unbelief and faith; and these journey through the path of unbelief, those who have preferred pleasure, on account of which they have forgotten the day of judgment, doing that which is not pleasing to God, and not caring to save their souls by the word, and have not anxiously sought their own good.  Truly they know not that the counsels of God are not like men’s counsels; for, in the first place, He knows the thoughts of all men, and all must give an account not only of their actions, but also of their thoughts.  And their sin is much less who strive to understand well and fall, than that of those who do not at all strive after good things.  Because it has pleased God that he who errs in his knowledge of good, as men count errors, should be saved after being slightly punished.  But they who have taken no care at all to know the better way, even though they may have done countless other good deeds, if they have not stood in the service He has Himself appointed, come under the charge of indifference, and are severely punished, and utterly destroyed.


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