« Prev If a Principle Be Good, Carry It Out. Next »

Chapter XXIV.—If a Principle Be Good, Carry It Out.

“‘But if we must emulate their lives, let us imitate not only their adulteries, but also their banquets.  For Kronos devoured his own children, and Zeus in like manner his own daughter.  And what must I say?  Pelops served as a supper for all the gods.  Wherefore let us also, before unhallowed marriages, perpetrate a supper like that of the gods; for thus the supper would be worthy of the marriages.  But this you would never consent to; no more will I to adultery.  Besides this, you threaten me with the anger of Eros as of a powerful god.  Eros is not a god, as I conceive him, but a desire occurring from the temperament of the living creature in order to the perpetuation of life, according to the foresight of Him who worketh all things, that the whole race may not fail, but by reason of pleasure another may be produced out of the substance of one who shall die, springing forth by lawful marriage, that he may know to sustain his own father in old age.  And this those born from adultery cannot do, not having the nature of affection towards those who have begotten them.

« Prev If a Principle Be Good, Carry It Out. Next »
Please login or register to save highlights and make annotations
Corrections disabled for this book
Proofing disabled for this book
Printer-friendly version





Advertisements



| Define | Popups: Login | Register | Prev Next | Help |