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Chapter XIX.—Close of the Love-Letter.

“‘I know that to those uninitiated in the truth these things seem dreadful and most base; but not so to the gods and the philosophers of the Greeks, nor to those initiated in the mysteries of Dionysus and Demeter.  But above all these, not to waste time in speaking of the lives of all the gods, and all the philosophers, let the two chief be your marks—Zeus the greatest of the gods, and Socrates of philosophic men.  And the other things which I have mentioned in this letter, understand and attend to, that you may not grieve your lover; since, if you act contrarily to gods and heroes, you will be judged wicked, and will subject yourself to fitting punishment.  But if you offer yourself to every lover, then, as an imitator of the gods, you shall receive benefits from them.  For the rest, dearest one, remember what mysteries I have disclosed to you, and inform me by letter of your choice.  Fare thee well.’

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