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Chapter VIII.—Flattery or Magic.

“Then Appion, being really puzzled, said:  ‘What am I to say to you?  For at one time, as one perturbed with love, you pray to obtain her; and anon, as if you loved her not, you make more account of your fear than your desire:  and you think that if you can persuade her you shall be blameless, as without sin; but obtaining her by the power of magic, you will incur punishment.  But do you not know that it is the end of every action that is judged, the fact that it has been committed, and that no account is made 258of the means by which it has been effected?  And if you commit adultery, being enabled by magic, shall you be judged as having done wickedly; and if by persuasion, shall you be absolved from sin in respect of the adultery?’  Then I said:  ‘On account of my love, there is a necessity for me to choose one or other of the means that are available to procure the object of my love; and I shall choose, as far as possible, to cajole her rather than to use magic.  But neither is it easy to persuade her by flattery, for the woman is very much of a philosopher.’

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