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Chapter VII.—A Distinction with a Difference.

“Then Appion said:  ‘Do you not think it is the same thing, whether you obtain her by magic, or by deceiving her with words?’  Then said I:  ‘Not altogether the same; for these differ widely from one another.  For he who constrains an unwilling woman by the force of magic, subjects himself to the most terrible punishment, as having plotted against a chaste woman; but he who persuades her with words, and puts the choice in her own power and will, does not force her.  And I am of opinion, that he who has persuaded a woman will not suffer so great punishment as he who has forced her.  Therefore, if you can persuade her, I shall be thankful to you when I have obtained her; but otherwise, I had rather die than force her against her will.’

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