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Chapter IX.—“The Weak Things of the World.”

“Whence a man ought to pass by all else, and commit himself to the Prophet of the truth alone.  And we are all able to judge of Him, whether he is a prophet, even although we be wholly unlearned, and novices in sophisms, and unskilled in geometry, and uninitiated in music.  For God, as caring for all, has made the discovery concerning Himself easier to all, in order that neither the barbarians might be powerless, nor the Greeks unable to find Him.  Therefore the discovery concerning Him is easy; and thus it is:—

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