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Chapter VII.—Poseidon, Zeus, and Metis.

“When, then, they say that this primordial substance, although most filthy and rough, was devoured by Kronos, that is, time, this is to be understood in a physical sense, as meaning that it sank downwards.  And the water which flowed together after this first sediment, and floated on the surface of the first substance, they called Poseidon.  And then what remained, the purest and noblest of all, for it was translucent fire, they called Zeus, from its glowing (zeousa) nature.  Now since fire ascends, this was not swallowed, and made to descend by time or Kronos; but, as I said, the fiery substance, since it has life in it, and naturally ascends, flew right up into the air, which from its purity is very intelligent.  By his own proper heat, then, Zeus—that is, the glowing substance—draws up what is left in the underlying moisture, to wit, that very strong10681068    The Paris ms. has “very fine.” and divine spirit which they called Metis.


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