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Chapter XII.—Clement’s Rebuke of the People.

“And this wrongful treatment of my heralds would have been against all from the beginning, if from the beginning the unworthy had been called to salvation.  For that which is now done wrongfully by these men serves to the vindication of my righteous foreknowledge, that it was well that I did not choose from the beginning to expose uselessly to public contempt the word which is worthy of honour; but determined to suppress it, as being honourable, not indeed from those who were worthy from the beginning—for to them also I imparted it—but from those, and such as those, unworthy, as you see them to be,—those who hate me, and who will not love themselves.  And now, give over laughing at this man, and hear me with respect to his announcement, or let any one of the hearers who pleases answer.  And do not bark like vicious dogs, deafening with disorderly clamour the ears of those who would be saved, ye unrighteous and God-haters, and perverting the saving method to unbelief.  How shall you be able to obtain pardon, who scorn him who is sent to speak to you of the Godhead of God?  And this you do towards a man whom you ought to have received on account of his good-will towards you, even if he did not speak truth.”

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