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Chapter XIV.—The Vessel of the Church.

“For the whole business of the Church is like unto a great ship, bearing through a violent storm men who are of many places, and who desire to inhabit the city of the good kingdom.  Let, therefore, God be your shipmaster; and let the pilot be likened to Christ, the mate898898    It is impossible to translate these terms very accurately.  I suppose the πρωρεύς was rather the “bow-oarsman” in the galley. to the bishop, and the sailors to the deacons, the midshipmen to the catechists, the multitude of the brethren to the passengers, the world to the 221sea; the foul winds to temptations, persecutions, and dangers; and all manner of afflictions to the waves; the land winds and their squalls to the discourses of deceivers and false prophets; the promontories and rugged rocks to the judges in high places threatening terrible things; the meetings of two seas, and the wild places, to unreasonable men and those who doubt of the promises of truth.  Let hypocrites be regarded as like to pirates.  Moreover, account the strong whirlpool, and the Tartarean Charybdis, and murderous wrecks, and deadly founderings, to be nought but sins.  In order, therefore, that, sailing with a fair wind, you may safely reach the haven of the hoped-for city, pray so as to be heard.  But prayers become audible by good deeds.


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