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Chapter XXVIII.—Buttresses of Gentilism.

“But let us return to our purpose.  What reason is there, yea, rather, what madness possesses the minds of men, that they worship and adore as a god, a man whom they not only know to be impious, wicked, profane—I mean Jupiter—incestuous, a parricide, an adulterer, but even proclaim him publicly as such in their songs in the theatres?  Or if by means of these deeds he has deserved to be a god, then also, when they hear of any murderers, adulterers, parricides, incestuous persons, they ought to worship them also as gods.  But I cannot understand why they venerate in him what they execrate in others.”  Then Peter answered:  “Since you say that you cannot understand it, learn of me why they venerate wickedness in him.  In the first place, it is that, when they themselves do like deeds, they may know that they shall be acceptable to him, inasmuch as they have but imitated him in his wickedness.  In the second place, because the ancients have left these things skilfully composed in their writings, and elegantly engrafted in their verses.  And now, by the aid of youthful education, since the knowledge of these things adheres to their tender and simple minds, it cannot without difficulty be torn from them and cast away.”

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