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Chapter LIX.—A Scene of Mourning.

“And when he said this, I said to him, ‘And what advantage will you gain from this deed?’  Then Simon said:  ‘In the first place, that those who are seeking me may lay hold on him, and so give over the search for me.  But if he be punished by Cæsar, that his sons may have much sorrow, who forsook me, and fled to Peter, and are now his assistants.’  Now I confess to you, Peter, what is true.  I did not dare then tell Faustinianus; but neither did Simon give us opportunity of speaking with him in private, and disclosing to him fully Simon’s design.  Meantime, about the middle of the night, Simon has fled away, making for Judæa.  And Athenodorus and Appion have gone to convoy him; but I pretended bodily indisposition, that I might remain at home, and make him return quickly to you, if haply he may in any way be concealed with you, lest, being seized by those who are in quest of Simon, he be brought before Cæsar, and perish without cause.  And now, in my anxiety about him, I have come to see him, and to return before those who have gone to convoy Simon come back.”  And turning to us, Anubion said:  “I, Anubion, indeed see the true countenance of your father, because I was previously anointed by Simon himself, as I have told you, that the real face of Faustinianus might appear to my eyes; whence I am astonished and wonder at the art of Simon Magus, because you standing here do not recognise your father.”  And while my father and mother, and all of us, wept for the things which had befallen, Anubion, moved with compassion, also wept.

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