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Chapter LIII.—A Transformation.

But we, sitting with Peter the whole night, asking questions, and learning of him on many subjects, remained awake through very delight in his teaching and the sweetness of his words; and when it was daybreak, Peter, looking at me and my brothers, said:  “I wonder what has befallen your father.”  And while he was speaking my father came in, and found Peter speaking to us about him.  And when he had saluted he began to apologize, and to explain the reason why he had remained abroad.  But we, looking at him, were horrified; for we saw on him the face of Simon, yet we heard the voice of our father.  And when we shrank from him, and cursed him, my father was astonished at our treating him so harshly and barbarously.  Yet Peter was the only one who saw his natural countenance; and he said to us:  “Why do you curse your father?”  And we, along with our mother, answered him:  “He appears to us to be Simon, though he has our father’s voice.”  Then Peter:  “You indeed know only his voice, which has not been changed by the sorceries; but to me also his face, which to others appears changed by Simon’s art, is known to be that of your father Faustinianus.”  And looking at my father, he said:  “The cause of the dismay of your wife and your sons is this,—the appearance of your countenance does not seem to be as it was, but the face of the detestable Simon appears in you.”

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