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Chapter XXXIII.—An Approaching Recognition.

Then I answered:  “How know you that she cohabited with her slave abroad, and died in his society?”  Then the old man said:  “I know it with perfect certainty; not indeed that she was married to the slave, as indeed I had not even discovered that she loved him.  But after she was gone, my brother gave me the whole story, telling me that first she had loved himself; but he, being honourable as a brother, would not pollute his brother’s bed with the stain of incest.  But she, being both afraid of me, and unable to bear the unhappy reproaches (and yet she should not be blamed for that to which her Genesis compelled her), pretended a dream, and said to me:  ‘Some one stood by me in a vision, who ordered me to leave the city without delay with my two twins.’  When I heard this, being anxious for her safety and that of my sons, I immediately sent away her and the children, retaining with myself one who was younger.  For this she said that he had permitted who had given her warning in her sleep.”

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