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Chapter XXI.—Mechanical Theory.

“But if you would rather have the opinions of others of the Greek philosophers,—and you are acquainted with mechanical science,—you are of course familiar with what is their deliverance concerning the heavens.  For they suppose a sphere, equally rounded in every direction, and looking indifferently to all points, and at equal distances in all directions from the centre of the earth, and so stable by its own symmetry, that its perfect equality does not permit it to fall off to any side; and so the sphere is sustained, although supported by no prop.  Now if the fabric of the world really has this form, the divine work is evident in it.  But if, as others think, the sphere is placed upon the waters, and is supported by them, or floating in them, even so the work of a great contriver is shown in it.

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