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Chapter XX.—Plato’s Testimony.

“But some one will say that these things are done by nature.  Now, in this, the controversy is about a name.  For while it is evident that it is a work of mind and reason, what you call nature, I call God the Creator.  It is evident that neither the species of bodies, arranged with so necessary distinctions, nor the faculties of minds, could or can be made by irrational and senseless work.  But if you regard the philosophers as fit witnesses, Plato testifies concerning these things in the Timæus, where, in a discussion on the mak171ing of the world, he asks, whether it has existed always, or had a beginning, and decides that it was made.  ‘For,’ says he, ‘it is visible and palpable, and corporeal; but it is evident that all things which are of this sort have been made; but what has been made has doubtless an author, by whom it was made.  This Maker and Father of all, however, it is difficult to discover; and when discovered, it is impossible to declare Him to the vulgar.’  Such is the declaration of Plato; but though he and the other Greek philosophers had chosen to be silent about the making of the world, would it not be manifest to all who have any understanding?  For what man is there, having even a particle of sense, who, when he sees a house having all things necessary for useful purposes, its roof fashioned into the form of a globe, painted with various splendour and diverse figures, adorned with large and splendid lights; who is there, I say, that, seeing such a structure, would not immediately pronounce that it was constructed by a most wise and powerful artificer?  And so, who can be found so foolish, as, when he gazes upon the fabric of the heaven, perceives the splendour of the sun and moon, sees the courses and beauty of the stars, and their paths assigned to them by fixed laws and periods, will not cry out that these things are made, not so much by a wise and rational artificer, as by wisdom and reason itself?

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