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Chapter XVIII.—The Concourse of Atoms Could Not Make the World.

“Then, in the next place, if they are ceaselessly borne about, and always coming, and being added to things whose measure is already complete, how can the universe stand, when new weights are always being heaped upon so vast weights?  And this also I ask:  If this expanse of heaven which we see was constructed by the gradual concurrence of atoms, how did it not collapse while it was in construction, if indeed the yawning top of the structure was not propped and bound by any stays?  For as those who build circular domes, unless they bind the fastening of the central top, the whole falls at once; so also the circle of the world, which we see to be brought together in so graceful a form, if it was not made at once, and under the influence of a single forth-putting of divine energy by the power of a Creator, but by atoms gradually concurring and constructing it, not as reason demanded, but as a fortuitous issue befell, how did it not fall down and crumble to pieces before it could be brought together and fastened?  And further, I ask this:  What is the pavement on which the foundations of such an immense mass are laid?  And again, what you call the pavement, on what does it rest?  And again that other, what supports it?  And so I go on asking, until the answer comes to nothing and vacuity!

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