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Chapter XV.—Folly of Idolatry.

“But I should like if those who worship idols would tell me if they wish to become like those whom they worship?  Does any one of you wish to see in such sort as they see? or to hear after the manner of their hearing? or to have such understanding as they have?  Far be this from any of my hearers!  For this were rather to be thought a curse and a reproach to a man, who bears in himself the image of God, although he has lost the likeness.  What sort of gods, then, are they to be reckoned, the imitation of whom would be execrable to their worshippers, and to have whose likeness would be a reproach?  What then?  Melt your useless images, and make useful vessels.  Melt the unserviceable and inactive metal, and make implements fit for the use of men.  But, says one, human laws do not allow us.762762    [This, with the more specific statement of Homily X. 8, points to an early date.—R.]  He says well; for it is human laws, and not their own power, that prevents it.  What kind of gods, then, are those which are defended by human laws, and not by their own energies?  And so also they are preserved from thieves by watch-dogs and the protection of bolts, at least if they be of silver, or gold, or even of brass; for those that are of stone and earthenware are protected by their own worthlessness, for no one will steal a stone or a crockery god.  Hence those seem to be the more miserable whose more precious metal exposes them to the greater danger.  Since, then, they can be stolen, since they must be guarded by men, since they can be melted, and weighed out, and forged with hammers, ought men possessed of understanding to hold them as gods?


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