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Chapter XXIV.—God the Author of Good, Not of Evil.

To this Peter answered:  “Since, then, you confess that you are ignorant, now learn.  Your question demanded our deliverance on two matters that are contrary to one another.  For every motion is divided into two parts, so that a certain part is moved by necessity, and another by will; and those things which are moved by necessity are always in motion, those which are moved by will, not always.  For example, the sun’s motion is performed by necessity to complete its appointed circuit, and every state and service of heaven depends upon necessary motions.  But man directs the voluntary motions of his own actions.  And thus there are some things which have been created for this end, that in their services they should be subject to necessity, and should be unable to do aught else than what has been assigned to them; and when they have accomplished this service, the Creator of all things, who thus arranged them according to His will, preserves them.  But there are other things, in which there is a power of will, and which have a free choice of doing what they will.  These, as I have said, do not remain always in that order in which they were created:  but according as their will leads them, and the judgment of their mind inclines them, they effect either good or evil; and therefore He hath proposed rewards to those who do well, and penalties to those who do evil.683683    [Comp. Homily XIX. 12.  The argument here is far more philosophical.—R.]


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