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Chapter LXXIII.—Tidings of Simon.

But in those days a letter was received from the brethren who had gone before, in which were detailed the crimes of Simon, how going from city to city he was deceiving multitudes, and everywhere maligning Peter, so that, when he should come, no one might afford him a hearing.  For he asserted that Peter was a magician, a godless man, injurious, cunning, ignorant, and professing impossible things.  “For,” says he, “he asserts that the dead shall rise again, which is impossible.  But if any one attempts to confute him, he is cut off by secret snares by him, through means of his attendants.  Wherefore, I also,” says he, “when I had vanquished him and triumphed over him, fled for fear of his snares, lest he should destroy me by incantations, or compass my death by plots.”  They intimated also that he mainly stayed at Tripolis.715715    [In Homily III. 58 Simon is represented as doing great miracles at Tyre.  Peter follows him there, but finds that he has gone.  The long discussions with him are assigned to Laodicea.  See Homilies, xvi., etc.—R.]


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