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111Chapter L.—Simon’s Presumption.

Then Peter:662662    [With chaps. 50, 51, comp. Homily XVII. 13, etc.—R.]  “Does it not seem to you to be madness, that any one should take upon himself to assert that there is another God than the God of all; and should say that he supposes there is a certain power, and should presume to affirm this to others, before he himself is sure of what he says?  Is any one so rash as to believe your words, of which he sees that you are yourself doubtful, and to admit that there is a certain power unknown to God the Creator, and to Moses, and the prophets, and the law, and even to Jesus our Master, which power is so good, that it will not make itself known to any but to one only, and that one such an one as thou!  Then, further, if that is a new power, why does it not confer upon us some new sense, in addition to those five which we possess, that by that new sense, bestowed upon us by it, we may be able to receive and understand itself which is new?  Or if it cannot bestow such a sense upon us, how has it bestowed it upon you?  Or if it has revealed itself to you, why not also to us?  But if you of yourself understand things which not even the prophets were able to perceive or understand, come, tell us what each one of us is thinking now; for if there is such a spirit in you that you know those things which are above the heavens, which are unknown to all, and incomprehensible by all, much more easily do you know the thoughts of men upon the earth.  But if you cannot know the thoughts of us who are standing here, how can you say that you know those things which, you assert, are known to none?”


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