« Prev Prudence in Dealing with Opponents. Next »

Chapter IV.—Prudence in Dealing with Opponents.

“But for other reasons also it is of importance that I should have some knowledge of this man.  For if I know that in those things concerning which it cannot be doubted that they are good, he is faultless and irreproachable,—that is to say, if he is sober, merciful, upright, gentle, and humane, which no one doubts to be good qualities,—then it will seem to be fitting, that upon him who possesses these good virtues, that which is lacking of faith and knowledge should be conferred; and so his life, which is in other respects worthy of approbation, should be amended in those points in which it shall appear to be imperfect.  But if he remains wrapped up and polluted in those sins which are manifestly such, it does not become me to speak to him at all of the more secret and sacred things of divine knowledge, but rather to protest and confront him, that he cease from sin, and cleanse his actions from vice.  But if he insinuate himself, and lead us on to speak what he, while he acts improperly, ought not to hear, it will be our part to parry him cautiously.  For not to answer him at all does not seem proper, for the sake of the hearers, lest haply they may think that we decline the contest through want of ability to answer him, and so their faith may be injured through their misunderstanding of our purpose.”

« Prev Prudence in Dealing with Opponents. Next »
Please login or register to save highlights and make annotations
Corrections disabled for this book
Proofing disabled for this book
Printer-friendly version





Advertisements



| Define | Popups: Login | Register | Prev Next | Help |