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6. But let us allow, as you wish, that the gods are accustomed to such disturbance, and that sacrifices are offered and sacred solemnities performed to calm it, when, then, is it fitting that these offices should be made use of, or at what time should they be given?—before they are angry and roused, or when they have been moved and displeased even?47974797    Lit., “set in indignations.” If we must meet them with sacrifices beforetheir anger is roused, lest they become enraged, you are bringing forward wild beasts to us, not gods, to which it is customary to toss food, upon which they may rage madly, and turn their desire to do harm, lest, having been roused, they should rage and burst the barriers of their dens. But if these sacrifices are offered to satisfy47984798    Lit., “if this satisfaction of sacrifices is offered to.” the gods when already fired and burning with rage, I do not inquire, I do not consider, whether that happy47994799    So the ms. and most edd., reading laeta, for which Ursinus suggested lauta—“splendid,” and Heraldus elata—“exalted.” and sublime greatness of spirit which belongs to the deities is disturbed by the offences of little men, and wounded if a creature, blind and ever treading among clouds of ignorance, has committed any blunder,—said anything by which their dignity is impaired.


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